Study Hospice Use On The Rise But After LateStage Aggressive Care

first_imgStudy: Hospice Use On The Rise, But After Late-Stage Aggressive Care A study released Tuesday found that, although the number of elderly people who died in a hospice setting is increasing, it usually came late in the process and after highly aggressive care near the end of life.USA Today: Hospice Care Used More, But Often Too LateTwice as many elderly people died in hospice care as in a hospital or nursing home compared with a decade ago, but hospice is often treated as a last resort — and used too late to benefit patients and their families, says a study released Tuesday. The researchers examined Medicare records for 840,000 people 66 or older who died in 2000, 2005 and 2009 (Lloyd, 2/5).Politico: Study: Boost In Hospice Visits By Way Of The ICUAt first blush it looks like great news: More Americans are choosing to die with hospice instead of spending their final days tethered to machines in a high-tech modern hospital. But a deeper look at the data finds a countervailing trend. Yes, more people are getting hospice care — but they are getting it for only a few days and often, only after highly aggressive care near the end of life, including multiple hospitalizations and stays in intensive care units (Kenen, 2/6).Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Aggressive Care Still The Norm For Dying SeniorsAlthough federal data show that fewer Medicare beneficiaries are dying in hospitals, new research suggests that doesn’t mean they’re getting less aggressive care in their final days (Tran, 2/5). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

State Highlights Ohio Readies Funding For New Medicaid Computer System

first_imgState Highlights: Ohio Readies Funding For New Medicaid Computer System This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. A selection of health policy stories from North Carolina, Ohio, Maryland, Arkansas, New York, Colorado, South Dakota, Florida, Kansas and California.North Carolina Health News: State Medicaid Director Carol Steckel ResignsCarol Steckel, the state’s Medicaid director, is leaving after eight months on the job. Her departure is the latest in a string of high-profile departures from the Department of Health and Human Services, which has been plagued of late by personnel issues (Hoban, 9/23).The Associated Press: NC Medicaid Director Leaving For Private SectorThe director of North Carolina’s Medicaid program announced Monday that she is leaving, eight months after taking the job. Her departure calls into question the future of a proposal to shift operations of the government health care program for the poor toward the private sector (Robertson,9/23).The Raleigh News & Observer: NC Medicaid Director Resigns After Eight Months On JobLegislative leaders from both parties expressed concern over Steckel’s decision. The leading House budget writer said he hoped the resignation would slow the momentum toward transferring Medicaid to commercial insurers. And the House minority leader said it was further proof that the General Assembly needs to investigate turmoil at the department and its management of the $14 billion Medicaid program (Neff and Bonner, 9/24).The Cleveland Plain Dealer: State Board Approves Funding For New Medicaid Computer System, Financial Perks For Omnova MoveThe Ohio Controlling Board on Monday approved $116 million for a new Medicaid eligibility computer system as well as state financial incentives for a number of private-sector projects in the Cleveland area. The new software system, designed to handle changes made under the Affordable Care Act, will replace the state’s 32-year-old computer system used to determine Medicaid eligibility, Ohio Department of Medicaid spokesman Sam Rossi said. He said the old software is inaccurate 60 percent of the time, forcing county caseworkers to override the system by hand (Pelzer, 9/23).Columbus Dispatch: $116 Million OK’d To Replace State Medicaid Computer SystemThe state Controlling Board approved $116 million in mostly federal funds to replace a 32-year-old computer system that determines eligibility for Medicaid and other government programs. With Medicaid expansion possible as state lawmakers return to action, spending requests related to the state-federal health-insurance program are getting scrutiny. Pressed by Rep. Chris Redfern, D-Port Clinton, on whether the new computer system would be able to handle the estimated 275,000 low-income Ohioans that will be added to Medicaid if an expansion is approved, Department of Administrative Services officials assured him it could (Siegel, 9/24). The Associated Press/Washington Post: Company Objects Over Being Disqualified From Bidding For Arkansas Medicaid ContractThe head of a Maryland company disqualified from bidding on a Medicaid contract in Arkansas complained Monday that the state relied too much on the knowledge that Louisiana had terminated a similar contract and didn’t take into account the firm’s performance in other states (9/23).The Wall Street Journal: Amid Push for Clinics, Some Patients Prefer HospitalsHealth care officials are searching for funds to open smaller clinics as hospitals close. But another obstacle might prove equally hard to overcome: New Yorkers like their local hospitals. Clinics are typically open during business hours, not evenings and weekends. It often takes weeks to get an appointment. Health-care experts say clinics are sometimes perceived as less trustworthy than imposing brick hospitals that have been in the neighborhood for decades. Smaller clinics staffed by local residents create privacy fears in tightly knit cultural communities (Kusisto and Fox, 9/23).The Wall Street Journal: Brooklyn Grapples With Struggling Hospitals And Demand For Health CareA new vision for Brooklyn health care was unveiled two years ago with much fanfare: Several struggling hospitals would merge with others, a state panel proposed, and less-expensive outpatients clinics would spring up in their place (Kusisto, 9/23).Kaiser Health News: Colorado Floods Isolate Hospital At Foot Of RockiesAs snow begins falling in Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, the town at its doorstep, finds itself newly isolated. The only year-round road into or out of town now is the Peak to Peak Highway. It traverses a jumble of mountains all the way — not the kind of road an ambulance can scream along at 60 miles an hour (Whitney, 9/24).The Associated Press: South Dakota Clinic Billed As Affordable Health Care Is Expanding Into AberdeenA nonprofit organization that provides affordable health care at 18 medical and dental clinics in South Dakota is expanding into Aberdeen. Howard-based Horizon Health Care Inc. has been awarded an $810,000 federal grant to open the clinic and will receive additional funding to operate it, Chief Operating Officer Jeff Mengenhausen told the American News of Aberdeen (9/24).Health News Florida: Biggest Bid-Winner: Sunshine State Health PlanSunshine State Health Plan, a subsidiary of Centene Corp., won more contracts than any other company in the bidding for a slice of the Florida Medicaid program as it shifts its entire enrollee population into managed-care plans. The Agency for Health Care Administration released the list of bid-winners for the general Medicaid-enrollee population — mainly mothers and children — late Monday afternoon, ending a nervous wait by companies, their investors and Wall Street analysts. Billions of dollars are at stake (Gentry, 9/23).Kansas Health Institute: Work In Progress: KanCare Problems Persist For ProvidersKanCare apparently looks different [in rural Smith County] than it does in Topeka. … Brownback officials have tended to paint a rosier picture, particularly when describing the program to the broader public. Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer when asked recently about some of the problems said the KanCare initiative was going “better than expected” (Shields, 9/23).California Healthline: San Diego County’s 10-Year Public Health Initiative Shows Early ProgressThree years into a 10-year plan to alter the landscape of public health, the county Health & Human Services Agency is preparing to present its third annual report to the County Board of Supervisors about the progress of Live Well, San Diego! Live Well, San Diego! is a comprehensive public health initiative that involves widespread community partnerships to address the root causes of illness and rising health care costs (Zamosky, 9/23).last_img read more

Rural Residents Pay More For Exchange Plans

first_imgRural residents paid slightly higher premiums for exchange health plans than their city counterparts, reports Modern Healthcare. Meanwhile, Vermont’s GOP leaders say they want the state’s health insurance exchange to succeed, but residents are fed up with problems.Modern Healthcare: Rural Residents Pay More for Exchange Plans Than City DwellersRural residents paid slightly higher premiums on exchange plans in 2014 than their urban counterparts, according to a new analysis of plan filings. The average monthly premium for the second-cheapest silver plan, which is designed to cover 70% of medical costs, was $387 in rural counties, compared to $369 for urban counties. But those in states with a large percentage of rural residents, regardless of where they lived, saw significantly higher premiums this year. For states with less than 5% of residents living in rural counties, the average premium was $402. But for states where more than half of the population lived in rural counties, the average monthly premium was $452 (Demko, 8/5).The Associated Press: Vermont GOP Leaders Want Health ReformThe three top Republicans in the Vermont Legislature said Tuesday they want the state’s health care exchange to succeed but state residents are fed up with the problems the system is having and more options should be considered to ensure those problems are fixed. Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, Senate Minority Leader Joe Benning and House Minority Leader Don Turner spoke a day after the administration of Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin announced the state is reducing its ties with CGI, the company that developed the problem-plagued Vermont Health Connect website (Ring, 8/5). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Rural Residents Pay More For Exchange Planslast_img read more

For The Health Sector Monday Was Marked By Takeovers And Acquisitions

first_imgFor The Health Sector, Monday Was Marked By Takeovers And Acquisitions The Wall Street Journal reports that pharmaceutical companies showed that they remain willing to merge with other companies, as Teva Pharmaceuticals acquired Auspex Pharmaceuticals and Horizon Pharma announced that it would purchase Hyperion Therapeutics. For the second time this month, Amgen has lost a battle over its effort to block a biosimilar version of its Neupogen drug, a $5.7 billion seller that is used to fend off infections during chemotherapy. This time, the FDA denied a citizen’s petition the biotech filed arguing that Sandoz, which plans to sell a biosimilar, violated federal law by failing to provide it with needed information by a specified deadline. (Silverman, 3/30) It’s the busiest day for takeovers in the health-care industry. UnitedHealth Group Inc. struck Monday’s largest purchase — $13.2 billion for drug-benefit manager Catamaran Corp. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries made a $3.1 billion splash back into dealmaking with Auspex Pharmaceuticals. Horizon Pharma agreed to buy Hyperion Therapeutics Inc. for $866 million to treat lucrative rare diseases. And Fujifilm Holdings Corp. is acquiring Cellular Dynamics International Inc., a maker of human cells, for $239 million. (Lachapelle, 3/30) M&A has helped drive the rally in biotech stocks in the past few years. And while many investors have grown concerned that valuations are getting too lofty, pharmaceutical companies showed that they remain willing to pay up for their targets. On Monday, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. announced that it would acquire Auspex Pharmaceuticals Inc. for roughly $3.2 billion at a 42% premium to its closing price on Friday. Horizon Pharma announced that it would purchase Hyperion Therapeutics for $955.7 million in cash, at a price just 7.6% premium over its closing price Friday but roughly 55% above its price one month ago. The deals announced Monday show how M&A is both reshaping the pharmaceutical industry and rapidly responding to it. Midsize and large pharmaceutical companies have struggled to refill their product pipelines as many of their biggest cash-generating drugs come off patent. (Farrell, 3/30) On the regulatory and legal front – This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Bloomberg: Busiest Day For Health Care Deals Is Set To Spawn More The Wall Street Journal’s Pharmalot: Amgen Loses Another Round In Its Battle To Fend Off A Biosimilar Rival The Wall Street Journal’s Moneybeat: What Biotech Bubble? Specialty Pharma Stocks Pop Again On Merger Monday GlaxoSmithKline Plc has agreed to settle a lawsuit by Johnson & Johnson accusing it of using false advertising at the start of the U.S. allergy season to grab market share. Glaxo received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to sell Flonase over the counter in July, setting the stage for greater competition. J&J units McNeil-PPC Inc and McNeil Consumer Healthcare filed the lawsuit on March 12, accusing Glaxo of making unsupported claims about Flonase at the expense of McNeil’s drugs Benadryl and Zyrtec. (Raymond, 3/30) Reuters: J&J, Glaxo Settle U.S. Lawsuit Over Allergy Meds last_img read more

Senate Panel Adds 1 Billion To VA Funding For Private Care For

first_imgSenate Panel Adds $1 Billion To VA Funding For Private Care For Patients The funding boost was not publicized by leaders of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee. In addition, two members of the House are hoping to stop VA researchers from running tests on dogs. Representatives from both parties want to protect dogs from medical research at the Veterans Affairs Department. Disturbed that the department has subjected some dogs to lobotomies and spinal cord research, two dog lovers in the House, Nevada Democrat Dina Titus and Republican Dave Brat from Virginia, have introduced a bill (HR 3197) to prohibit any medical testing there that causes dog pain. It’s a multi-front attack. The two earlier this year got an amendment added to a spending bill (HR 3219) that would have barred the VA from spending money on dog research. (Sipkin, 12/4) CQ: Mystery $1 Billion For Private Care Emerges In Veterans Bill CQ: Lawmakers Press VA To End Medical Testing On Dogs center_img Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee members may not have known they plunged an additional $1 billion into a private care access program for veterans during a markup Wednesday. The boost to private medical care would be directed to the Veterans Choice Program, a temporary program rolled out in November 2014 designed to help patients who have to wait too long or drive too far to a VA-run facility. The Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee confirmed late Thursday the $1 billion was included when asked about it by CQ. (Mejdrich, 12/1) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

2020 MercedesBenz GLE PHEV Spied Lapping Nurburgring Video

first_img Mercedes-Benz Delivers First GLC F-Cell Plug-In Hybrid The new GLE PHEV should enter sales from mid-2019 as a 2020 model year under the new EQ Power badge for Mercedes plug-in hybrids Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 28, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Mercedes-Benz tests the new GLE PHEV at the trackThe upcoming new generation Mercedes-Benz GLE plug-in hybrid is expected to have up to 100 km (62 miles) of all-electric range under the WLTP test cycle.The longer range will not be the only trump card as the German manufacturer makes efforts to improve performance too. Here is the latest video from a test run at the Nürburgring Nordschleife.Mercedes-Benz plug-in hybrids Mercedes-Benz GLE Plug-In Hybrid Expected To Go 62 Electric Miles (WLTP) Source: Electric Vehicle News Comparison Of New Mercedes-Benz EQ Power Plug-In Hybridslast_img read more

Why Mercedes Formula E Lessons Have Been PointLess

first_img Has Formula E Created The Ultimate Racing Rules Package? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 11, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Mercedes has taken a very different approach to its Formula E preparations than fellow 2019/20 entrant Porsche, sending HWA on a fact-finding mission one season in advance. Four disastrous races in, what has it learned? Source: Electric Vehicle News Mercedes-Benz Reveals Formula E Concept Liverycenter_img For the 2019/20 season Mercedes – and fellow manufacturer Porsche – will finally join FE. Mercedes will have a second high-profile global championship, running alongside its Formula 1 behemoth, and FE will be bursting with entries from many of the most famous marques from motorsport history.But while Mercedes and Porsche both announced their intentions to join FE in the same period – in late 2016 and mid ’17 respectively – they have taken very different approaches to their preparations for their full works entries. Porsche claims it “never” considered running a feeder team ahead of season six, but Mercedes-affiliated HWA gained the 11th berth for the current season. HWA will run the Mercedes FE race squad from next season and has always maintained that the current campaign would be a learning year to make sure it was fully prepared.But the first four races of the 2018/19 season has been a very trying time for HWA.At the first round in Saudi Arabia, things actually got off to a good start when ex-McLaren F1 driver Stoffel Vandoorne shone in the gloomy qualifying session to take fourth on the grid. But he went backwards in the race and finished 16th, while his team-mate Gary Paffett, the reigning DTM champion, retired after contact with a wall.Things got much worse in Marrakech where both drivers suffered technical issues ahead of the race, then collided at the first corner and had to retire as a result. In Santiago, Vandoorne again stood out in qualifying to start fifth, but lost a likely points finish as he crashed out at the halfway point of the scorching event. Paffett did make the finish but was a lap down after suffering further technical problems.Last time out at Mexico City, both HWA drivers made it to the end of the race for the first time this season, but were down in 16th and 18th, and Vandoorne was on the receiving end of two penalties for fanboost-activation infractions.Stoffel Vandoorne, HWA Racelab, and Gary Paffett, HWA RacelabPhoto by: Alastair Staley / LAT ImagesThat is not the glittering set of results one might expect of an eight-time DTM champion.“Everybody was always hoping for more, but we’re pretty much exactly seeing what I’ve always said and what I’ve always told people,” says HWA team boss and CEO, Ulrich Fritz. “You don’t get here and just smash everybody, there are highly professional teams in the paddock who have been doing this for years now.“It would be not humble enough to say you can just jump them and fight for victories. I think the base product is maybe also not at a level where we can compete for victories on a regular basis. But it’s good enough to score points and if we put our things together, if the drivers put their things together, then I think we’re in for a strong result.”So HWA is, sort of, where it expected it to be. Not winning, but also not doing quite as badly as the results table indicates. Indeed, as Fritz points out, had Vandoorne finished sixth in Santiago – where he was running before his crash – HWA would have scored eight points and be above NIO and Dragon in the teams’ championship.It must be taken at its word when it says this year is fundamentally about learning the ins and outs of FE ahead of Mercedes’ arrival. So what, then, has it discovered from the four tough lessons that have played out so far this season?“We’ve learned a lot,” says Fritz. “We’ve really learned about the competitiveness in Formula E, [and] we’ve really learned on the technical side that you need to take so much attention to detail because really small small things can turn out in a DNF or whatever. Which just [can be] followed by a chain of strange and difficult events. That is just something I happened to see only in Formula E.”Stoffel Vandoorne, HWA Racelab, VFE-05 Gary Paffett, HWA Racelab, VFE-05Photo by: Zak Mauger / LAT ImagesFE’s closely competitive nature is often highlighted as a reason to watch and get involved in the championship. The spread of winners so far this season – four drivers from four different teams have triumphed so far – bears that out. But it also means Mercedes can be right in contention from the off if the powertrain being developed at its Brixworth engine base is as good as the manufacturer’s pedigree suggests it should be.Let’s assume the Mercedes entry starts at the foot of the 2019/20 table alongside Porsche for the first round. Based on FE’s current qualifying rules, the four drivers from those two squads would be running in the fourth and final group and would have every chance of repeating BMW Andretti’s feat from this season’s opening round in Saudi Arabia – immediately going from last to first…But before we get too carried away, HWA has learned the hard way how little things can cause big problems in FE. After pointing out the possibility of encountering a “chain of strange and difficult events”, Fritz cites a specific example of a lesson it had to go through that will surely be one Mercedes won’t have to learn next season.“Such an unfortunate chain of difficult events was just in the race [in Santiago],” says Fritz. “Gary’s temperature was a little bit high and he was then asked by the engineer to switch the positions on the steering wheel. And by switching these positions on the steering wheel, he somehow went through the 225kW mode, which ended up in a drive-through penalty because we got this [power] overshoot. Only for 0.3s, because it was just flipping it through, but it happens.“You learn a lot from those things. [In Mexico] the switch was completely new and different. But we need to take what we get from our manufacturer [Venturi] and obviously things like that haven’t happened to them in the past four years, so we experienced it for the first time and we jointly worked on it, and we just made it better. That’s just a small example, but it goes from A-Z.”Gary Paffett, HWA Racelab, VFE-05Photo by: Alastair Staley / LAT ImagesFritz says HWA is “learning on a 360-degree approach and package”. This means it has sussed out the best way to set up its garage (or tent, depending on which city FE is visiting), how to arrange its engineers, and improve the performance of its mechanics.Just knowing how best to use “the time you get after the [freight] boxes are open” has been valuable knowledge HWA has gained for Mercedes – although in this area it had to endure another tough lesson. In Marrakech the squad was fined €5000 for an organisational team member arriving too early before the race day curfew had ended, setting up to work on his laptop, unaware that by opening the garage he had broken a rule even though it had nothing to do with the team’s cars.The first third of the 2018/19 season is already in the book, and while there aren’t too many pleasant memories for HWA to look back on, there’s plenty of races left for it score points and grab the high-profile results its lineage and employee talent is capable of achieving. It will work closely with Venturi to make progress with its customer powertrain – although Fritz points out that “we aren’t a manufacturer, [so] we aren’t allowed to do a lot, [and] secondly it’s a little bit late anyway and you have homologated parts”.But Venturi’s form in Mexico – where Felipe Massa qualified third and Edoardo Mortara finished in the same position – should at least give HWA encouragement that its powertrain is capable of a podium. Fritz, who was speaking the day before the most recent race, clarifies that it is the combination of the whole HWA package that means it is unlikely – although not fully out of the question – for it to score a win, and it’s not down to problems with the powertrain it has purchased.“I wouldn’t really push that down to the powertrain or whatever,” he says. “For me, the package is not only the drivetrain, it’s also not only the car – it’s also the software behind it, the engineering behind it or whatever. And we need to learn a lot for that. So, all in all, we don’t have the package at the moment to win races here against very strong competition.”Stoffel Vandoorne, HWA Racelab, VFE-05Photo by: Alastair Staley / LAT ImagesNow that its show car has been unveiled, Mercedes’ FE marketing and full season-six preparations are going to go up a level. It has already received its test and development chassis from FE supplier Spark, although the car had yet to hit the track when Fritz spoke in Mexico.But the development work for the 2019/20 packages is already well advanced. Only last week the DS Techeetah squad completed its first of 15 days of manufacturer testing at the Calafat circuit, where Mahindra Racing was also present. Mercedes and the rest, including Porsche, will start putting the miles on their season six powertrains soon – if they haven’t already.Where Mercedes and Porsche have taken a second different approach ahead of their full FE entries relates to their respective driver line-ups. Porsche has already confirmed Neel Jani will be one of its season six racers, whereas Mercedes won’t announce its driver plans until after the summer.“It’s too early to think about it, but on the other hand we’ve come here with a driver line-up we believe can be a competitive one,” says Fritz. “To make decisions into one or the other direction after just four races – where in most of the races we haven’t managed to give the drivers the package they deserved – would be too early and therefore this is absolutely not on our discussion list at the moment.”With its haul of DTM titles, all of which it scored with Mercedes, HWA’s capabilities will shine through eventually, even if the FE points table currently looks pretty disastrous. Its reach now extends throughout motorsport, from its customer GT racing programmes to Formula 2 and Formula 3, and still in the DTM with R-Motorsport and Aston Martin.That adds up to quite a machine, which Mercedes will benefit from in the next FE season. So even if HWA’s electric adventures have been point-less so far, there’s nothing to suggest it will stay that way or hinder the might of its manufacturer in season six. Formula E RC Cars Battle On The Streets For Our Hearts: Video Earlier this week Mercedes teased its fans by showcasing a concept livery on its Formula E show car at the Geneva Motor Show. While the colour scheme itself was underwhelming, the fact that the manufacturer is now in a position to build up its marketing might around FE demonstrates once again that the electric championship is approaching an exciting new phase.More Formula E Newslast_img read more

German parts maker ZF looks to bring racing car technologies to production

first_imgSince 2016, German parts maker ZF has supplied technology for French EV maker Venturi’s team in the FIA Formula E racing series.ZF has developed an electric drive for the team, which includes a 250 kW electric motor with a specially designed transmission ratio and power electronics. ZF says this drive enjoys much higher energy conversion efficiency than volume production applications, and it plans to incorporate these new developments in its electric drives for street vehicles.For the racing vehicles, ZF used a lightweight metal alloy for the transmission housing and carbon in the power electronics. Dry sump lubrication increases the energy conversion efficiency in the transmission’s reduction gears. The ZF team used silicon carbide in the power electronics, which it says can be designed ten times thinner than current silicon types, leading to lower internal resistance. The results, ZF says, are increased battery efficiency and range.The parts maker hopes that concepts it initially developed for racing cars will gradually find their way into volume production applications, including a special winding design for electric motor stators. ZF specifically hopes to introduce silicon carbide into volume production for power electronics in three to four years.Jörg Grotendorst, Head of ZF E-Mobility, said, “A lot of the experience we’ve gained from the racing application will impact on future ZF products.”Source: ZF Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

Ankers Powerhouse 120000mAh Portable Generator is 350 Reg 500 more

first_imgAnker’s eBay storefront offers its Powerhouse 400Wh 120000mAh Portable Generator for $349.99 shipped. Discount reflected in-cart.  Regularly $500, today’s deal is good for $120 off and the best available. The Anker Powerhouse delivers everything you need to enjoy power on-the-go with out having to use a gas generator. Its 120000mAh battery provides juice to four USB ports, an AC outlet, and more. It can power a TV, mini fridge, MacBooks and other devices. Ever since I positively reviewed this model last year, I’ve used it to power up drones away from home and run my projection system outdoors. Rated 4.1/5 stars. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Anker’s Powerhouse 120000mAh Portable Generator is $350 (Reg. $500), more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Friday Roundup

first_imgVote, motion for reconsideration, and for the reading stack. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.VoteFCPA Professor has been selected as one of the best legal blogs by the Expert Institute.  If FCPA Professor adds value to your practice or business or otherwise enlightens your day, you can vote for FCPA Professor as the best niche/specialty blog here. It only takes a minute and your vote is most appreciated.Motion for ReconsiderationUnhappy with U.S. District Court Judge Janet Bond Arterton’s (D. Conn.) recent interpretation in U.S. v. Hoskins (see here) of the FCPA that Congress actually enacted, the DOJ recently filed this motion for a reconsideration. The motion is based almost entirely on the DOJ’s views on the FCPA’s legislative history, demonstrating once again the importance of the FCPA’s legislative history (see here).Reading StackSpeaking of the recent decision in U.S. v. Hoskins, this King & Spalding alert states:“[T]he Government argued for an accomplice theory, consistent with the Resource Guide to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. That guidance, first released in 2012, posed just such a hypothetical scenario:Moreover, even if [defendant] had never taken any actions in the territory of the United States, they can still be subject to jurisdiction under a traditional application of conspiracy law and may be subject to substantive FCPA charges under Pinkerton liability, namely, being liable for the reasonably foreseeable substantive FCPA crimes committed by a co-conspirator in furtherance of the conspiracy.The District Court rejected that theory, based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Gebardi v. United States, which established that whenever Congress has intentionally excluded certain individuals from liability for a specific law, this congressional intent must not be circumvented by prosecuting such individuals based on accomplice liability.While the District Court rejected accomplice liability as an additional basis for FCPA jurisdiction, it remains to be seen how other courts will address this question, and whether the DOJ and the SEC will revisit their guidance on the matter. Given the rarity of written judicial opinions interpreting the FCPA, this ruling is likely to have an outsized impact on future FCPA enforcement actions.”For additional reading on how the FCPA Guidance is an advocacy piece and not a well-balanced portrayal of the FCPA as it is replete with selective information, half-truths, and, worse information that is demonstratively false, see here.*****An informative read here from the FCPAmericas blog titled “Localizing Compliance Programs in Latin America.”“The compliance programs for Latin American subsidiaries of foreign companies often consist of translated versions of the program used at headquarters, without any (or just minor) adaptations. Oftentimes, this practice has the potential to negatively impact the ability of the program to operate at optimum levels and can lead to problems. Here are five practical steps that companies can take to maximize the efficiency of their compliance programs in Latin America.”*****An interesting read here from Robert Appleton titled “Despite Prosecutions, Corruption Levels Stay the Course.”“In light of this [increased corruption enforcement] activity [around the world], one might expect that corruption levels would decrease. But they have not. Why hasn’t it happened? The focus of this piece is to propose some possible explanations for this anomaly.”*****A good weekend to all.last_img read more

Japan aims for the heart of an asteroid

first_imgThe Hayabusa 2 team hopes their probe will have a far less eventful voyage than its predecessor. Before and after touching down on the asteroid Itokawa in 2005, the first Hayabusa had to overcome fuel leaks, multiple equipment failures, and a weeks-long loss of communications that had mission managers worried the craft was lost. But in 2010, after a 7-year, 6-billion-kilometer space odyssey, Hayabusa set an historic first: It brought samples from the surface of an asteroid back to Earth. Combining the findings of the Hayabusa missions, which target different asteroid types, and those of a European spacecraft’s recent visit to a comet promises to sharpen our understanding of the early solar system and which of its varied bodies might have seeded our planet with water and organic compounds. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Japan today successfully launched Hayabusa 2, a spacecraft that if all goes well will return to Earth in 2020 carrying samples, including, for the first time, material from beneath the weathered surface of an asteroid.Less than 2 hours after a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency H-IIA rocket lifted off from the Tanegashima Space Center at 1:22 p.m. local time, Hayabusa 2, developed by the agency’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, separated from the rocket’s second stage and embarked on its planned 6-year round trip to asteroid 1999 JU3. The probe will collect data while circling the asteroid, deploy several small landers, and briefly touch down to collect surface samples. Then, in the most audacious gambit of the mission, Hayabusa 2 will release an impactor that will blast a crater into the asteroid. The spacecraft will then touch down a second time and capture ejecta. Comparing samples from the surface and from underground will give scientists a better idea of the original material of this asteroid type and how space weathers it.last_img read more

Star formation caught in the act

first_imgIn teenagers as in stars, the first years of life are times of great change. A massive protostar that lies about 4250 light-years from Earth has undergone a dramatic evolution over the course of just 18 years, a new study reveals. In 1996, when scientists used a radio telescope to observe a star-forming region dubbed W75N(B), one of the objects in that cloud—called VLA 2—had very little structure: Its magnetic field wasn’t oriented in any particular direction, and the ionized material streaming from the star—its version of solar wind—spewed outward at similar speeds in all directions. But observations last year hint that the protostar’s stellar wind was flowing more quickly from the object’s poles (relative speeds depicted in bluish ovoid in image above), and its magnetic field had become aligned with that of the larger cloud of gas and dust that surrounds it, the researchers report online today in Science. Material flowing out from the equatorial regions is slowed substantially as it runs into the doughnut-shaped disk of dust and gas that surrounds the protostar, the researchers explain. Over the next few hundred thousand years, W75N(B)-VLA 2 will evolve into a star about six times the mass of our sun, team members estimate. Another protostar forming in the same cloud of material, dubbed W75N(B)-VLA 1, sported an organized magnetic field in 1996 and therefore is farther along in its stellar evolution, likely because it’s more massive. Continuing observations of the handful of massive protostars in the cloud will shed new light on the earliest stages of star formation, enabling researchers to fine-tune their models of how such stars evolve.last_img read more

Podcast Nuclear annihilation drunk chimpanzees and more

first_imgHow do animals recover from nuclear annihilation? Do chimpanzees seek out alcohol the same way we do? And how many viruses have you been exposed to throughout your life? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi. Plus, Sara Iverson discusses how telemetry has transformed the study of animal behavior in aquatic ecosystems, and Monita Chatterjee discusses the impact of cochlear implants on the ability to recognize emotion in voices.last_img read more

WHO director calls for emergency Zika meeting

first_imgAll of those questions are on the agenda for Monday, Chan said today. She called the epidemic and the increase in a birth defect called microcephaly “a heartbreaking burden on families and communities.” Babies with microcephaly have heads smaller than normal, usually indicating that the brain has failed to develop properly. The condition can be caused by drug use, genetic mutations, or in utero infections.Brazil has seen a spike in microcephaly cases after Zika started spreading there. Since October, Brazilian health authorities have recorded more than 4000 cases. But a health ministry spokeswoman said yesterday that those initial numbers may be too high. When officials looked more closely at more than 700 cases, they found that 462 of them could be ruled out—either the babies did not have microcephaly or the condition could be attributed to causes such as drug abuse by the mother. The authorities were able to confirm 270 cases as due to infections, but so far only six have been confirmed as positive for Zika.The number of open questions about Zika is another reason for WHO to encourage more research and to attempt to coordinate efforts so that answers can come more quickly, Gostin says. “They dropped the ball on Ebola. There’s a genuine worry that WHO doesn’t have the capacity to lead. This will give them the chance to demonstrate they can do that.” Chan’s announcement today is an important first step in the fight against Zika, says Lawrence Gostin, an expert in global health law at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He was an author on a commentary published yesterday in the Journal of the American Medical Association that criticized WHO for acting too slowly in its response to the epidemic. “WHO is finally recognizing the urgency of Zika,” he says. “It is a promising start. Now we need to follow words with actions.” The agency should provide technical assistance to affected countries to help with mosquito control—currently the only defense against the disease—and should coordinate research on key questions about how the disease is spreading, how it might be affecting fetal development, and on vaccine development, Gostin says. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) An emergency panel convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) will discuss on Monday what steps should be taken to slow the spread of Zika, the mosquito-borne virus spreading quickly through Latin America. WHO director-general Margaret Chan announced the panel today at a meeting of WHO’s Executive Board in Geneva, saying that “[t]he level of alarm is extremely high.” The Zika virus is suspected of causing severe birth defects and occasional but serious neurological complications in adults. The virus has spread to 23 countries in the Western Hemisphere, after emerging in Brazil in May 2015.The committee will decide whether the epidemic deserves to be designated a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern.” That would allow WHO to issue travel restrictions and would also be a strong signal that more resources should be devoted to studying and fighting the virus. The last such emergency was declared in August 2014 in response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa; it is still in place today. WHO was widely criticized for taking that step many months too late. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Crypt keeper wasp is a parasite of a parasite

first_imgYou can’t play a player, but you can parasitize a parasite. That’s what researchers discovered was happening to the crypt gall wasp (Bassettia pallida), which lays eggs in the stems of certain oaks. The larvae’s presence causes compartments dubbed crypts to form and protect them until they chew through the stem to emerge in adulthood. But just as the crypt gall wasp manipulates this plant to become its home, a newly discovered species also seems to manipulate the crypt gall wasp to do its bidding. The new species—known as the crypt keeper wasp (Euderus set, pictured) deposits its egg within the crypt—likely inside the adult crypt gall wasp—and triggers the crypt gall wasp host to stop digging through the stem, plugging its exit hole with its own head partway out of the tree. The adult crypt keeper wasp then pops out of the tree with very little effort of its own, after consuming the crypt gall wasp from the inside out. The extra help appears critical for the crypt keeper’s survival—those that had to leave the tree by digging through bark themselves were almost three times more likely to die trapped in the crypt, the scientists report today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. In future research, the scientists hope to verify that the crypt keeper is really the puppet master behind its host’s strange behavior by uncovering exactly how it pulls the strings.last_img read more

Podcast Mysterious racehorse injuries and reforming the US bail system

first_img Southern California’s famous Santa Anita racetrack is struggling to explain a series of recent horse injuries and deaths. Host Meagan Cantwell is joined by freelance journalist Christa Lesté-Lasserre to discuss what might be causing these injuries and when the track might reopen.In our second segment, researchers are racing to understand the impact of jailing people before trial in the United States. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the negative downstream effects of cash bail—and what research can tell us about other options for the U.S. pretrial justice system.Last up is books, in which we hear about the long, sometimes winding, roads that food can take from its source to your plate. Books editor Valerie Thompson talks with author Robyn Metcalfe about her new work, Food Routes: Growing Bananas in Iceland and Other Tales from the Logistics of Eating.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.*Correction, 1 April, 12 p.m.: A previous version of this podcast included an additional research technique that was not used to investigate the Santa Anita racetrack.Download the transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Mark Smith/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Mark Smith/Flickr last_img read more

Money Ideas Meet Scholar Shaping Black Wall Street

first_imgLegacy Builder Dr. Ricco Wright, founder of the Black Wall Street Gallery is part of the reimagining that’s occurring in the historic Black Wall Street area of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In this motivating clip presented by Prudential and Urban One, the educated, multifaceted scholar and business owner reflects on his graduate school experience and the moment he realized the relationship between money and his ideas. A trip to New York City reminded him that talent is everywhere. See how he moved from visionary to businessman and built an art gallery in his own backyard. Related Articles AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail LegacyProd Presented by Legacy Lives On: Revitalization, Reimagination, Creating A Legacy Grandparents, parent and granddaughter together Black Folks + Money: Stop Overthinking Wealth READ MORE Also On News One: Prudential NewsOne Image READ MORE 20 Tweets Dragging Roseanne Barr To A White Privilege Helllast_img read more

Two held for murder after Punjab officials death

first_imgLabh Singh was a Class IV employee of the Water Supply Department and was posted at the department’s office in Sandaur. His job was to man the department’s tubewell during fixed supply hours and later collect water bills from houses in the village.“Normally a lump sum bill is generated by the water supply department in villages and door-to-door collection is done from houses after calculating average per house. It is normally between Rs 100-200 per month, but non-payment of bills is a common practice,” said a villager.Sources said the total outstanding amount in water bills in Sandaur is close to Rs 18 lakh. Lal had not paid his bill for months, they added. Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Top News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Labh Singh (57) was allegedly assaulted by Manohar Lal and his sons Gaurav and Vipin when he went to their house to recover pending water bills on June 16. After staying in coma for almost two weeks, Singh died on June 30 at a hospital in Ludhiana. The three men were charged with murder after his death. Lal was arrested soon after the incident and Gaurav and Vipin were arrested Wednesday.Sandaur SHO Surinder Bhalla said, “The FIR was lodged on the day of incident with charges of physically and mentally hurting the person. On June 30, we added Section 302 IPC (murder). Manohar Lal is in judicial custody. Gaurav Kumar and Vipin Kumar, will be produced in court on Thursday. Investigation is still on.”Jaswant Singh, son-in-law of Labh Singh, told The Indian Express, “He had gone to the house of Manohar Lal in Sandaur village for recovery of water bill. Manohar called him inside and started slapping him. The family also shot a video of the assault and shared it.” Written by Raakhi Jagga | Ludhiana | Updated: July 4, 2019 4:06:36 am Advertising 0 Comment(s) Advertising LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Punjab Police, Punjab Water Supply Department official death, Sandaur Punjab official murder, Punajb news, Indian express Singh went to home of the accused to collect water billsPolice on Wednesday arrested two more men on charges of murder after the death of a Water Supply Department official who was allegedly beaten up during a bill collection drive in Sandaur village in Punjab’s Sangrur district.last_img read more

Rescued from bonded labour Kancheepurams Kasi still in fear

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Written by Arun Janardhanan | Kancheepuram | Updated: July 12, 2019 12:41:30 pm tamil nadu bonded labour, tamil nadu bonded labour row, bonded labour in tamil nadu, bonded labour in india, kancheepuram, kancheepuram bonded labour, tamil nadu government, india news, Indian Express The 70-year-old fell at the feet of revenue officials when they reached the woodcutting unit in Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, on a tip-off. (Express photo by Jerusha Venkatarangam)Hours after revenue officials released him and two dozen other bonded labourers from the custody of a woodcutting unit owner in Tamil Nadu’s Kancheepuram district, Kasi was threatened by those who kept him in custody for several years for a loan of Rs 20,000. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Top News Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising Ayyappan (25) and his wife Ponniammal (20) are Kasi’s neighbours. They married after Ponniammal’s first husband died. “He (Ayyappan) agreed to look after me and my three children. We had been living inside the woodcutting unit. Once in two months, we were allowed to visit our village to meet relatives but had to return in a few hours,” she said.Ayyappan said he had borrowed Rs 10,000 from Natarajan few years ago for treatment.“I had to keep working for them. It was like a permanent debt. Even after officials dropped us home late last night, owners came and threatened us. They said they will kill everyone if we don’t return,” he said.Among those rescued on Wednesday were 10 children, who were forced to work along with their parents to repay their debt.Kancheepuram sub-collector A Saravanan was not available for comment. Tahsildar Ramani said the sub-collector was the inquiry officer and the release certificates will be issued only after the inquiry is completed. Ramani is one of the officials who rescued the labourers from the woodcutting unit. “The moment we entered the unit, he (Kasi) ran to us and fell at the feet. We told him that he shouldn’t be doing that and we had come to help them,” she said. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan center_img Advertising A neighbour of Kasi said, “He (the owner) is not even absconding. He himself came and threatened us last night.”On Wednesday, revenue officials of Vellore and Kancheepuram districts rescued a total of 42 people from two separate woodcutting units. While majority of them are from Periyakarumbur village, four families had been picked up from Vanthavasi by owner of the woodcutting unit Natarajan and his son-in-law Prashanth.The rescue operation was conducted in coordination with the International Justice Mission and was based on a tip-off from Released Bonded Labourers Association, a collective of released bonded labourers who are now working for their rights. The 14 people released in Ranipet in Vellore received their release certificates on Wednesday.“I had been working for Natarajan for over five years for Rs 20,000 I borrowed from him,” said Kasi. Best Of Express “After the rescue in the morning, they (revenue officials) dropped us at home late night. They gave us 10 kg rice, a dhoti and a saree before sending us back home. But last night itself, people close to the owner came and threatened us. We are afraid that they will harm us,” said Kasi, a resident of Periyakarumbur village near Kancheepuram.The 70-year-old came under the spotlight after newspapers carried a photograph in which he is seen falling at the feet of revenue officials when they reached the woodcutting unit based on a tip-off that several bonded labourers worked there.Kasi and the other labourers, all of them belonging to the ST Irula community, have not been given release certificates yet. These certificates cancel the “debt” to the employer and make those rescued beneficiaries to central and state schemes and give them an assistance of Rs 20,000 on the day of rescue. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach 4 Comment(s)last_img read more

Rajasthan MoS for Primary Secondary Education Will probe if there was RTE

first_img Advertising Best Of Express We have formed a committee to examine the merger exercise that the previous government undertook. According to the information we have, 2,851 schools were shut in violation of RTE norms. We will examine that and also see if some of these schools have enough students. If they do, we may reopen them.Are funds a challenge? Most of the schools depend heavily on private donors and community leaders to meet their infrastructure demands.Funding will never be an issue. The CM in his Budget speech said 50 new primary schools will be set up, 60 will be converted from primary to higher primary, 100 from higher primary to secondary, and 500 secondary schools will be turned into higher secondary schools. So many schools have never been announced in any Budget before. So funding is not an issue. Education is important for development, but it doesn’t become an election issue NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Govind Singh Dotasra, rajasthan, rajasthan schools, right to education, bal sabhas, Rajiv Gandhi Career guidance Govind Singh DotasraHow committed is the government to sustaining the educational reforms of the last few years? Supreme Court quashes plea seeking better RTE implementation After our government took over, 54,000 teachers whose cases were stuck in court were selected, counselled and sent to school. We did in six months what the previous government couldn’t in their five years.We also strengthened the bond between the community and government schools through monthly Bal Sabhas that are held in village chaupals across the state. These events are attended by teachers, students and community elders… the idea is for all stakeholders to come together to improve the quality of education. On the Bal Sabhas held on May 9, villagers made donations worth Rs 5 crore – additional rooms in schools, fans, furniture, uniform, RO, etc…We also launched the Rajiv Gandhi Career guidance portal for students of classes 9-12. Now every child has a login ID through which she can know her career options… Advertisingcenter_img By Express News Service | Updated: July 14, 2019 12:05:23 am In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Related News Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook We have also done a lot for teachers. For instance, there were 73 Urdu teachers who had been posted in schools where there were no students for the subject. Similarly, for teachers of commerce and so on. So we transferred them to match students with subject teachers and thus used our resources more effectively.We undid some of the curriculum changes the previous government brought in to impose the Sangh ideology on students.Also, for the first time, we set up 33 Mahatma Gandhi English-medium schools, one in each district, with Classes from 1 to 8. We had to do admissions through lottery because the demand was huge. We plan to set up such schools in every block.Is the government planning to reopen the schools that were merged by your predecessor? Private schools’ body alleges education policy recommendations attempt to usurp autonomy Post Comment(s)last_img read more