Letters to the Editor April 16, 2007

first_imgBob Woolmer with Pakistan Cricket TeamDeath of the Game The grand celebrations of the World Cup have now paved the way for a series of upsets in the form of a death and match-fixing allegations (“Tragedy, Mystery and a Cup of Woe”, April 2). This ninth edition of cricket’s most-celebrated,Bob Woolmer with Pakistan Cricket TeamDeath of the GameThe grand celebrations of the World Cup have now paved the way for a series of upsets in the form of a death and match-fixing allegations (“Tragedy, Mystery and a Cup of Woe”, April 2). This ninth edition of cricket’s most-celebrated tournament will forever remain etched in history.-C.K. SUBRAMANIAM, on e-mailFor cricket lovers, Woolmer’s murder is a matter of shame and has cast a pall of gloom on the World Cup.-BIDYUT KUMAR CHATTERJEE, FaridabadWhen commercialisation of this erstwhile gent-leman’s game had reached its zenith, could crime have remained far behind?-NAVNEET DHAWAN, DelhiWhat led to Woolmer’s death may soon come to light, yet the game’s real disease is its “overmonetisation”. When any creative pursuit becomes infested with too much lucre, it tends to degenerate, and instead of a “play” it changes into a “question of life and death”.-VIRENDRA KUMAR TANGRI, DehradunAll facets of the gentleman’s game now lie open in front of us. Woolmer’s death and the subsequent investigations pointing towards match-fixing, are enough reasons for one to give up on the game. But the love for cricket just refuses to die.-LALIT VERMA, Delhi And They all Fell Down…The performance of the Indian cricket team gives rise to a range of emotions, from ecstasy to happiness to doubt and finally to alarm (“It’s all Mathematics Now”, April 2). These men in blue take us through such an unwelcome rollercoaster rides that I wonder sometimes if it is really time to switch from cricket to kabaddi. At least then the pain of loss would not be ours and the panic attacks would not make a billion lives shorter by the ball.-J. AKSHAY, SecunderabadadvertisementThe build-up was exemplary, the expectations were scary, the hype was exponential and as usual the papered team was at its best (losing of course!). The bubble has burst. Team India of the World Cup is not about crushing the minnows, but putting a commendable performance against A-class opponents, and not being tamed by the tame.-CARLITO MONTEIRO, on e-mailThe Centre should enact a law curbing the cricketers’ commercial contracts as long as they are of playing for the country to assuage the feelings of millions of fans who are taken for a ride by our so-called champions who are actually minnows.-V.S. GANESHAN, BangaloreThe shock and grief at our performance in the World Cup cricket is immature and uncalled-for. The media hyped the Indian team as pretenders to the world crown for monetary reasons. India was knocking at the door of minnows club before the start of the World Cup. Hence there is no point in the blame game and further research on the nonexistent “debacle”.-DILIP GULWADI, on e-mailFutile ConjecturesGoing by Rahul Gandhi’s claim, 30 years from now his progeny may well say that “my father always told my mother that if he and not the other Rahul had been captain of the cricket team, India would have won the 2007 World Cup” (“Baptism by Fire”, April 2). K.R. RAVI, Maryland, USA Little history, like little knowledge, is a dangerous thing, particularly when a little politician like Rahul Gandhi unleashes it in a little town in Uttar Pradesh. Now that the “Gandhis” are in power, what about rebuilding the masjid? The taste of the pudding lies in its eating.-J. AKSHOBHYA, MysoreVote-catching is an essential feature of any democracy, but digging up an unsavoury piece of history to bolster up the sagging fortunes of one’s party may turn out to be a futile exercise. It would be a tragedy for the entire nation, if the fall of Babri Masjid continues to be viewed only through narrow political angles.-T.S. PATTABHI RAMAN, CoimbatureCost of DevelopmentWest Bengal Chief Minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharya’s struggle is the struggle of the Communist party in West Bengal (“The Struggle of Buddha”, April 2). Perhaps for the first time they are tasting their own bitter pill. He didn’t realise that this is not China and took it as easy as winning an election. Nandigram is a lesson for all but at the cost of 14 lives.-A. JACOB SAHAYAM, ThiruvananthapuramThe killings have taken place in a state governed by the “champions of poor”. The murder of innocent people has exposed that the difference between the Leftists and the agents of globalisation has vanished.-ARVIND K, PANDEY, AllahabadThe Watchdog’s Role I hope the media takes the Uttar Pradesh elections seriously and guides the electorate (“Three Horses and a Pony”, April 2). The voters are looking forward to a detailed analysis of the election strategies of all political parties.-SHIV SHANKER ALMAL, KolkataadvertisementCredit DeniedThe real architect of Karnataka Common Entrance Test was late Ramakrishna Hegde, whose vision had put the state on the world map and not Veerappa Moily (“Tale of Two Worlds”, April 2).-VATSALA VEDANTAM, on e-mailFashion ContoursFashion is unfair for commonman as it is beyond his reach (“Fair is Lovely”, April 2). Models are happy to expose their bodies, which onlookers are only too happy to see.-M. KUMAR, DelhiCorrectionIn the Power List (“Power Pyramid”, March 26), we erroneously mentioned that Videocon had acquired Whirlpool. The error is regretted.-EDITOR  POWER PLAY        Dirubhai AmbaniMukesh AmbaniSunil Bharti MittalAmitabh Bachchan        Kumar Mangalam BirlaAnil AmbaniAnand MahindraNandan M. Nilekani                 In your list there are a number of tax-dodgers and blackmoney holders (“Power Pyramid”, March 26). The day their number decreases, the nation will prosper.S.S. RAJAGOPALAN, ChennaiFor too long you have been depriving me of the regular day-to-day current event stories. For example, your recent Power List special took away so many pages that very little space was left for other stories. Please do not deprive me of my weekly reading.H.P. SHUKLA, on e-mailArvind Kejriwal and Vikram Akula deserve a standing ovation for the work they have done and for having made it to this Power List.ANIKA MOHLA, Delhilast_img read more

Samsung Galaxy M20 vs Asus ZenFone Max Pro M2: Brain goes against brawn

first_imgSince the last few weeks, Samsung has been going gaga over its brand new Galaxy M series smartphones. The company has been stressing highly that the new Galaxy M series is designed for millennials, while indirectly, it’s Samsung’s deadly weapon against the arsenal of various smartphone manufacturers such as Xiaomi, Honor, Motorola, Asus and even Nokia. The Galaxy M20 is the most expensive model in the M series for now. Starting at Rs 10,990, the Galaxy M20 goes up against popular offerings from Nokia, Asus and Xiaomi.The top-end variant of the Galaxy M20 costs Rs 12,990, which is similar to the entry-level variant of the Asus ZenFone Max Pro M2. The Max Pro M2 came out late last year and has proven to be the smartphone of choice for power users under Rs 15,000. The Max Pro M2 is the only smartphone in its category to offer Gorilla Glass 6 protection. Equipped with a Snapdragon 660 chip and a stock Android interface, the Max Pro M2 is easily one of the best affordable smartphones you can buy right now.Therefore, if you have Rs 12,990 to spare on a smartphone, which one would you prefer? I took both the Galaxy M20 and Max Pro M2 out for a spin for a few days and here’s how they compared.Design and build — Samsung impresses highlyThe sub-Rs 15,000 category now demands companies to offer attractive designs inspired from flagship smartphones. Samsung goes for the trend with the Galaxy M20 with a vertically stacked dual rear camera setup and an oval-shaped fingerprint scanner on the glossy plastic body. The plastic unibody design makes the M20 look smooth and elegant with lesser lines of separation. The M20 offers a 3.5mm headphone jack, a single loudspeaker and a USB-C port. Wait, what?advertisementA USB-C port on a budget Samsung smartphone? The Galaxy M20 has broken Samsung’s norm of reserving modern features only for flagships. Wonder what else is modern? The display. The Galaxy M20 sports a modern narrow-bezel display with a water drop notch on top. This is one of the first Samsung phones to feature a notch. Samsung has also reduced the chin drastically, which is appreciable for a smartphone with an LCD display. The ZenFone Max Pro M2, on the other hand, grabs eyeballs with Asus’ trademark reflective gradient on the plastic rear panel. In fact, it’s difficult not to get distracted the when the phone is kept flat on its face. The vertically-aligned dual camera module resembles a triple camera setup, which also adds to the looks. Asus’ cost-cutting measure is evident elsewhere a micro USB port on a 2019 midrange smartphone feels archaic. Also, the front of the phone features a notched display with a thick chin and big bathtub notch. With Gorilla Glass 6, the display should hold up well against scratches and damage when its dropped. However, our review unit sustained some scratchesboth on the display as well as the rear panel, when I was using it as my daily driver hence, get a screen guard and a case.Out of the two, the Galaxy M20 easily feels more modern with its minimalist approach to styling and a narrow-bezel display. However, the Max Pro M2 is a better bet for show-offs. My money would go for the Galaxy M20, considering my preference for understated designs.Display — both are equally goodI will make it short both the Galaxy M20 and Max Pro M2 look equally good in their own ways. The 6.3-inch TFT display on the Galaxy M20 renders vibrant colours with high contrasts that resembles Samsung’s AMOLED panels from other premium Samsung phones. The waterdrop notch and the narrow chin makes for an uninterrupted viewing experience, especially while streaming YouTube videos.The ZenFone Max Pro M2 has chunkier bezels, but the IPS LCD panel renders equally vibrant colours with similarly high contrasts. The bigger notch and chin make the phone a bit bulkier, even as it sports an equally big 6.3-inch display. However, I felt the Max Pro M2’s touch sensitivity is a tad better than that of the Galaxy M20’s display.Performance — You can’t beat muscle with smartnessThe Galaxy M20 debuts Samsung’s new Exynos 7904 chipset. This is an octa-core chip, with the processor consisting of 2 Cortex-A73 cores and 6 Cortex-A53 cores. With a Mali G71-2 GPU, the Galaxy M20 looks like a fairly competent performer. And for the most part, it does. Samsung’s Exynos processors are always well optimised and the Exynos 7904 handles most daily tasks thrown at it with ease. The Mali G71-2 GPU is not meant for gaming, but I was still able to play PUBG MOBILE in low graphics with medium frame rates. However, I wish Samsung offered a louder speaker on the M20.advertisement As for the ZenFone Max Pro M2, the fast and reliable performance doesn’t surprise. The Snapdragon 660, despite being a chip from 2017, can handle regular tasks without even batting an eyelid. The Adreno 512 GPU is very powerful I was able to play PUBG MOBILE in medium settings for longer sessions with absolute ease. The base variant with 3GB RAM may not hold as many apps as the Galaxy M20’s 4GB RAM, but in my daily usage, I never found it to lag or force close apps.Software — Samsung shows stock Android can be beatenThe Galaxy M20 cracks it with the software too. Yes, it runs on an old Android 8.1 Oreo in 2019, but the Samsung Experience 9.5 skin on top is, in my opinion, one of the most polished UI’s in sub-Rs 15,000 smartphones. The layout is spacious while fonts are easy to rear. The entire UI is snappy and unlike previous Samsung phones, the bloat is minimal. I spent an entire week with the phone and never did I felt installing a third-party launcher. Well done Samsung. The Max Pro M2 relies on a stock AOSP launcher based on Android 8.1 Oreo as well. While the stock UI is fast and fluid, it lacks the polish that Samsung packs in the M20’s UI. It feels rough around the edges, especially with disproportionate icons. For power users, this is exceptional as there’s no bloat or nonsensical apps to deal with. But I feel Asus could have used an Android One ROM for a more polished experience. Maybe the Android Pie update could offer a fix.Camera — Samsung knows what Indians wantSamsung has been promoting the wide-angle camera in the Galaxy M20’s marketing efforts. However, the standard 13-megapixel camera impresses more than the wide-angle camera. Especially when you compare it with the Asus phone, the Galaxy M20’s camera comes across as the better one. In daylight, photos are sharp and images exhibit vibrant colours. On occasions, I found the camera oversaturating the colours a little, but I was impressed with the outcome every time so did my friends. Low light performance is decent as the camera suppresses noise to make for useable photos. Sadly, the 8-megapixel selfie camera has some room to be improved.The ZenFone Max Pro M2 has received several camera updates that claim performance improvements. However, our review unit hasn’t received any update so far. Hence, the Max Pro M2’s camera performs similarly to what I wrote in my review two months ago. Daylight photos are good but sharpness is lost up to an extent. As for low light, the camera neither impresses with noise reduction nor with detail retention. The 13-megapixel selfie camera does a good job of retaining details as well as a wide dynamic range.advertisementOne thing’s clear — both these phones still can’t beat the Redmi Note 6 Pro in terms of camera performance.Battery — Goodbye power banks Both the ZenFone Max Pro M2 and Galaxy M20 feature a 5000mAh battery. And both of them can easily last more than an entire day after a full charge. Even with heavy usage, I was able to make it to the end of the day before I was hunting for the charger. The Samsung galaxy M20 does have an advantage though it comes with support for 15W fast charging, which should charge it faster than the Max Pro M2’s battery with its 10W fast charging support.ZenFone Max Pro M2 vs Galaxy M20 — And the winner is…After going through some key parameters, the Samsung Galaxy M20 comes across easily as the better option of the two. Samsung has heard and obliged to the market’s demands a very good display with a tiny notch, big battery with fast charging support and pleasant user experience. The Galaxy M20 has been designed smartly to keep up with India’s demands specifically.The ZenFone Max Pro M2 has its own advantages though the robust performance and a stock Android interface. The Max Pro M2 is for anyone who prioritises raw performance over everything else PUBG lovers on a budget shouldn’t look any further. However, even as a power user, I felt Asus launched an unfinished product and it requires more polishing to make it an unbeatable choice.ALSO READ | Asus Zenfone Max Pro M2 review: Fast hardware, crazy good battery helps it compete with Redmi Note 6 ProALSO READ | Samsung Galaxy M20 review: Great display, superb battery life make for a good startALSO READ | Asus Zenfone Max M2 quick review: Big screen, big battery, two cameras at a bargainlast_img read more

Voter turnout in local election advance polls more than double 2014s total

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Officials with the City of Fort St. John say that voter turnout in this year’s municipal election is more than double what it was in the previous local election four years ago.After two days of advance polling in this year’s election, the City’s Chief Election Officer Janet Prestley recorded 1,227 votes cast so far.By comparison, there were just 570 votes cast on both advance voting days in the 2014 election, when Fort St. John recorded the lowest voter turnout in all of B.C. This past Wednesday’s poll alone saw 752 votes cast – more than last year and a big increase over the turnout on October 10th of 475 voters.There are 12 candidates vying for six seats on Fort St. John City Council in this year’s election. Learn more about each by clicking the links below.Chuck FowlerLarry EvansGord KlassenBruce ChristensenJim HarrisLilia HansenBecky GrimsrudTrevor BolinGabor HarisByron StewartJustin JonesTony ZabinskyGeneral voting day in this year’s election is Saturday, October 20th at the Fort St. John Legion.last_img read more

Really sad to know how Advaniji and Joshiji has been treated Mamata

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Wednesday criticised BJP for its “ill treatment” towards party veterans L K Adavani and Murli Manohar Moshi and said it is “really sad” to see the way the party is treating its founding members. “Today I spoke to Adavaniji in the morning. I enquired about his health. He said he felt good that I had called him. “It is really sad to see the way BJP is treating its founding members. I don’t want to say much more as it is the internal matter of their party,” Banerjee, who is also the Trinamool Congress supremo said. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja Advani and Joshi have been denied ticket by BJP to contest the upcoming Lok Sabha polls in their states. In an apparent reference to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Main Bhi Chowkidar’ campaign, Banerjee said she has immense respect for real chowkidars and not for political chowkidars who are trying to derive “political mileage” out of it. She also criticised Modi for trying to derive “political mileage” out of the achievements of scientists. “Has Modi gone to space or has he done any research? He is just trying to gain political mileage out of it,” she said on the prime minister’s announcement that the country had demonstrated anti-satellite missile capability by shooting down a live satellite.last_img read more

Sudan braces for million strong protest march

first_imgKhartoum: Huge crowds are expected to join a “million-strong” protest march Thursday in Sudan to turn up the heat on the ruling military council after three of its members resigned following talks on handing over power. The rally outside the army headquarters comes after the military rulers and protest leaders agreed to set up a joint committee, to chart the way forward two weeks since the ouster of veteran president Omar al-Bashir. “We expect huge crowds to come to the protest site, including people from outside of Khartoum,” activist Ahmed Najdi told AFP. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USDemonstrator Ayman Ali Mohamed was among those preparing to march in the capital. “We fear that the military council might steal our revolution, so we have to participate until the transfer to civilian rule is accomplished,” he said. “We are standing our ground no matter what.” The planned march follows a late-night meeting between the military council and leaders of the umbrella group heading the protest movement. “We have an agreement on most demands presented in the document of the Alliance for Freedom and Change,” Lieutenant General Shamseddine Kabbashi, spokesman of the military council, told reporters afterwards. He did not elaborate on the key demand of handing power to a civilian government, but said there “were no big disputes”. The Sudanese Professionals Association, which spearheaded months of protests against Bashir, described the meeting as a step towards “confidence-building”. “Both sides agreed on the importance of joint cooperation to steer the country toward peace and stability,” the SPA said Thursday.last_img read more