US unemployment rate down one-tenth to 9.1 percent

first_imgTotal nonfarm payroll employment rose by 117,000 in July, and the unemploymentrate was little changed at 9.1 percent, down from 9.2 percent in June, the US Bureau of Labor Statisticsreported today. Job gains occurred in health care, retail trade, manufacturing,and mining. Government employment continued to trend down. The drop in the unemployment rate is attributed mostly to a reduction in the labor force, as fewer people were looking for work, but there was some modest gains in jobs.Household Survey DataThe number of unemployed persons (13.9 million) and the unemployment rate (9.1percent) changed little in July. Since April, the unemployment rate has shownlittle definitive movement. The labor force, at 153.2 million, was littlechanged in July, with a gain of 117,000.Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men(9.0 percent),adult women (7.9 percent), teenagers (25.0 percent), whites (8.1 percent),blacks (15.9 percent), and Hispanics (11.3 percent) showed little or no changein July. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.7 percent, not seasonally adjusted.The number of persons unemployed for less than 5 weeks declined by 387,000 inJuly, mostly offsetting an increase in the prior month. The number of long-termunemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over), at 6.2 million, changed littleover the month and accounted for 44.4 percent of the unemployed.The civilian labor force participation rate edged down in July to 63.9 percent,and the employment-population ratio was little changed at 58.1 percent.The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referredto as involuntary part-time workers) was about unchanged in July at 8.4 million.These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut backor because they were unable to find a full-time job.In July, 2.8 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, littlechanged from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Theseindividuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work,and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not countedas unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks precedingthe survey.Among the marginally attached, there were 1.1 million discouraged workers inJuly, about the same as a year earlier. (These data are not seasonallyadjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for workbecause they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 millionpersons marginally attached to the labor force in July had not searched forwork in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendanceor family responsibilities.Establishment Survey DataTotal nonfarm payroll employment increased by 117,000 in July, following littlegrowth over the prior 2 months. Total private employment rose by 154,000 overthe month, reflecting job gains in several major industries, including healthcare, retail trade, manufacturing, and mining. Government employment continuedto decline.Health care employment grew by 31,000 in July. Ambulatory health care servicesand hospitals each added 14,000 jobs over the month. Over the past 12 months,health care employment has grown by 299,000.Retail trade added 26,000 jobs in July. Employment in health and personal carestores rose by 9,000 over the month with small increases distributed amongseveral other retail industries. Employment in retail trade has increased by228,000 since a recent low in December 2009.Manufacturing employment increased in July (+24,000); nearly all of theincrease was in durable goods manufacturing. Within durable goods, the motorvehicles and parts industry had fewer seasonal layoffs than typical for July,contributing to a seasonally adjusted employment increase of 12,000.Manufacturing has added 289,000 jobs since its most recent trough in December2009, and durable goods manufacturing added 327,000 jobs during this period.In July, employment in mining rose by 9,000; virtually all of the gain (+8,000)occurred in support activities for mining. Employment in mining has increasedby 140,000 since a recent low in October 2009.Employment in professional and technical services continued to trend up in July(+18,000). This industry has added 246,000 jobs since a recent low in March2010. Employment in temporary help services changed little over the month andhas shown little movement on net so far this year.Elsewhere in the private sector, employment in construction, transportationand warehousing, information, financial activities, and leisure and hospitalitychanged little over the month.Government employment continued to trend down over the month (-37,000).Employment in state government decreased by 23,000, almost entirely due to apartial shutdown of the Minnesota state government. Employment in localgovernment continued to wane over the month.The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchangedover the month at 34.3 hours. The manufacturing workweek and factory overtimefor all employees also were unchanged at 40.3 hours and 3.1 hours, respectively.In July, the average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees onprivate nonfarm payrolls was 33.6 hours for the sixth consecutive month.In July, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrollsincreased by 10 cents, or 0.4 percent, to $23.13. Over the past 12 months,average hourly earnings have increased by 2.3 percent. In July, average hourlyearnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increasedby 8 cents, or 0.4 percent, to $19.52.The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for May was revised from +25,000to +53,000, and the change for June was revised from +18,000 to +46,000.US DOL. 8.5.2011last_img read more

SHOCK AS FAMOUS DONEGAL FURNITURE STORE GOES INTO LIQUIDATION

first_imgDD EXCLUSIVE: One of Donegal’s best-known furniture stores is to go into liguidation this evening (Saturday) with the loss of 50 jobs, Donegaldaily.com can reveal.Flanagan’s Furniture will cease trading at 6pm and a receiver has been appointed to the store.Queues of people were calling to the company’s Buncrana outlet all day as news of the closure spread. The store’s car park was closed put people could still enter the store where discounts on much of the furniture were being offered.Flanagans, which is 65 years old, was one of the most well-known and respected businesses across the country and was operated by owner Brian Flanagan.A spokesman for the store told Donegaldaily.com that as of 6pm today all the company’s assets would be frozen.Anybody with vouchers for the store have been advised to contact the store next week where the phones will still be manned. The employee added “This is a bit of a disaster. Brian has been working so hard to keep the store open but in the end he couldn’t.“People have been coming here all day saying they were sorry to Brian and the rest of the staff.“Many people have been up really good relationships with the store over the years and now it ends like this.“It couldn’t come at a worse time for the 50 or so staff just before Christmas,” she added.© 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights Reserved. This story will probably be nicked at some stage. But you get all the BIG stories FIRST right here on donegaldaily.com. The copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailySHOCK AS FAMOUS DONEGAL FURNITURE STORE GOES INTO LIQUIDATION was last modified: November 22nd, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Flanagan’s Furnitureliquidationlast_img read more