FoundationDB’s NoSQL Breakthrough Challenges Relational Database Dominance

first_imgRelated Posts How Do You Determine Which Partners Will Fuel Y… Tags:#databases#NoSQL NoSQL databases are well-known for their speed and scalability – useful traits when dealing with the size and complexity of big data and hyper-fast transaction requirements. But one thing they have lacked has been strong data consistency: the ability to ensure that an update to data in one part of the database is immediately propagated to all other parts of the database.A startup database vendor launched this week is making claims that its database, FoundationDB, finally delivers on the promise of true data consistency for a NoSQL database, without a huge loss of speed or flexibility.Understanding why this is such a big deal in the Big Data (or any) sector requires a little background on how NoSQL, or non-relational, databases work.Solving The ACID TestWhen talking about relational databases, like PostgreSQL, MariaDB, Oracle and the like, there’s one acronym that keeps coming up: ACID. ACID stands for Atomic, Consistent, Isolated and Durable – core aspects that must apply to all data within a relational database. Data is broken down to atomic values (name, address_1, city…) while remaining consistent across the database, isolated from other transactions until the current transaction is finished, and durable in the sense that the data should never be lost.The infrastructure of a relational database is well-suited to meet the ACID criteria for data: Data is held in tables connected by relational algebra, and transactions are performed in a way that is consistent with ACID principles.But for non-relational databases, such as Bigtable, MongoDB or Dynamo, ACID has always been sacrificed for other qualities, like speed and scalability.This tends to freak out some companies, stopping them from moving to NoSQL because they can’t give up ACID. Especially the “C,” because not having data consistency is a particularly terrifying prospect for companies dealing with financial transactions.Yet non-relational databases are being used by firms like Amazon and Google every day, with great success. Amazon, in particular, needs to track millions of sales transaction on any given day – how does it get away with inconsistent data?The short answer is, it has to. The trade-off would be a relational database that could never keep up with the speed and scaling necessary to make a company like Amazon work as it does now. Recall that non-relational databases are structured to sacrifice some aspect of ACID to gain something in return. In the case of Amazon, its non-relational DynamoDB database is willing to apply an “eventually consistent” approach to the data in order to gain speed and uptime for the system when a database server somewhere goes down (though Dynamo can also have strong consistency, an Amazon spokesperson informed us after this story went to press).Bringing Back ConsistencyIt’s not that having ACID compliance on a NoSQL database is impossible, explained David Rosenthal, one of FoundationDB’s co-founders. It’s just that most people think that applying ACID to NoSQL systems would come at a huge cost.That’s certainly what Werner Vogels, CTO of Amazon, thought in a 2008 paper that described the company’s Dynamo database and it’s relationship to consistency. Data inconsistency in large-scale reliable distributed systems has to be tolerated for two reasons: improving read and write performance under highly concurrent conditions; and handling partition cases where a majority model would render part of the system unavailable even though the nodes are up and running.Translation: Requiring ACID on non-relational databases would make that database too slow and inflexible.For the longest time, everyone using NoSQL systems was resigned to this eventual, or “weak,” consistency model. After all, they had money to make and data to analyze. Who cares if consistency was not at the top of the priority list?It turns out, quite a few people, including the founders of FoundationDB, Rosenthal, Nick Lavezzo and Dave Scherer.Inside FoundationDBAfter a successful start up with Visual Sciences, a technology that’s now part of Adobe as the Adobe Insight product, the trio turned to developing another successful project, and hit on the lack of ACID-capable non-relational databases as a goal.“We weren’t satisfied with any of the data guarantees on non-relational systems,” Rosenthal explained, even as they understood that the needs of many potential clients would preclude relational systems like MySQL or Oracle because of performance limitations.Non-relational systems seemed to wear their weak consistency model like a badge of honor, but in the secret origin story of FoundationDB, the team saw weak consistency as a bug, not a feature. “Not having transactional integrity is not a good thing,” Rosenthal emphasized.They’re not the only ones. Google’s up-and-coming Spanner database, a second-generation distributed database that could ultimately replace the search engine company’s Bigtable systems, is being built on the premise that transactional integrity has to be a part of that database, too.Side Effects Include…Establishing consistency in transactions within a NoSQL database is worthy news in itself, but the implications extend beyond that core news.FoundationDB uses a key-value-like storage engine core that’s surrounded by layers of whatever data model that’s needed, which will in turn enable developers to much more easily code their apps to reach into the FoundationDB. These layers, according to the founders, can’t be used on other key-value systems, because without consistent transactions, it would not work.Also, since data is going to be consistent, applications won’t have to be built to “wait” for data to catch up within a given transaction – thus making apps less complex and easier to build.The best news of all concerns the so-called performance penalty that many in the NoSQL world said will be incurred if ACID was applied to non-relational database systems. According to FoundationDB, performance is hampered by only 10%, which seems a very small price to pay for consistent transactions.The FoundationDB database, which was launched into public beta on Monday, is available for download now.Image courtesy of FoundationDB. How to Manage Remote Sales Teamscenter_img Steps to Building a Successful and Scalable Sal… Crucial Online Reputation Management Insights i… brian proffittlast_img read more

SEA Games: Don’t boo Schooling, Malaysians urged

first_imgSports Minister Khairy Jamaluddin said fans shouldn’t give Schooling a rough ride at the event from August 19-30 — and told them to remember that the swimmer’s mother is Malaysian.“No booing, no jeering,” he was quoted as saying in the New Straits Times newspaper Friday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“That is not what the SEA Games is about. Tensions will run high, cheer for your team but don’t jeer others.”He added Malaysians should not “dwell on this too much, it is important to remember that Joseph Schooling’s mother is Malaysian”. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief MOST READ View comments Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Kings’ Randolph arrested on pot charge at LA housing projectcenter_img LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Singapore’s bronze medallist Joseph Isaac Schooling poses on the podium of the men’s 100m butterfly swimming event at the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazan on August 8, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER NEMENOVMalaysia’s sports minister has urged fans not to boo Olympic swimming champion Joseph Schooling at the Southeast Asian Games, after the Singaporean sparked a furor by vowing to “teach (Malaysians) a thing or two”.Schooling, who won Singapore’s first gold medal at last year’s Rio Olympics, caused controversy with his remarks last week, before insisting he meant no offence and that his comments were taken out of context.ADVERTISEMENT PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding K-pop star Jung Joon-young convicted of gang rape, spycam crimes Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Schooling, who stunned his idol Michael Phelps to win 100m butterfly gold in Rio last year, is likely to play a starring role in Kuala Lumpur after he swept nine gold medals at the 2015 SEA Games in Singapore.last_img read more

10 months agoReal Madrid target Eriksen sends Tottenham message: They know what I want

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Real Madrid target Eriksen sends Tottenham message: They know what I wantby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChristian Eriksen says Tottenham know what he wants from a new contract amid interest from Real Madrid.The Spurs ace has less than 18 months to run on his current deal and talks over an extension have stalled.It is believed the club will hold out for £225 million for the Real Madrid target. However, Eriksen is seemingly keen to re-sign with Tottenham, but only if they meet his demands.He told TV3 Sport: “[The future is] not something I’m thinking of. I focus on playing football, and there are many battles you have to think about which must be won.”Responding specifically to Madrid’s interest, he added: “It is not the first time that there have been rumours, and when the newspapers write something, it is not something we are masters of. If there is nothing concrete, then I just comment on rumours.”I think people know what I want, and I know what they [Tottenham] would like. There is a nice dialogue so there is nothing [new] there.” last_img read more

Voter turnout in local election advance polls more than double 2014s total

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Officials with the City of Fort St. John say that voter turnout in this year’s municipal election is more than double what it was in the previous local election four years ago.After two days of advance polling in this year’s election, the City’s Chief Election Officer Janet Prestley recorded 1,227 votes cast so far.By comparison, there were just 570 votes cast on both advance voting days in the 2014 election, when Fort St. John recorded the lowest voter turnout in all of B.C. This past Wednesday’s poll alone saw 752 votes cast – more than last year and a big increase over the turnout on October 10th of 475 voters.There are 12 candidates vying for six seats on Fort St. John City Council in this year’s election. Learn more about each by clicking the links below.Chuck FowlerLarry EvansGord KlassenBruce ChristensenJim HarrisLilia HansenBecky GrimsrudTrevor BolinGabor HarisByron StewartJustin JonesTony ZabinskyGeneral voting day in this year’s election is Saturday, October 20th at the Fort St. John Legion.last_img read more

IndianOil provides employment to 394 skilled youths under CSR

first_imgNew Delhi: IndianOil’s Refineries Headquarters had undertaken a major drive last year to train youths from Delhi-NCT region in various training courses to support the national campaign of Skill India. As part of sustainable project, 394 candidates who cleared the courses successfully were provided with job placements in trades like Sewing Machine Operator, General House Keeping, Emergency Medical Technician, Vision Technician, Customer Care Executive, and General Duty Assistance. V K Shukla, Executive Director(HR), IndianOil, while addressing the first batch of successful trainees, during the convocation ceremony, exhorted them to regularly update their skills and knowledge, to stand good in any circumstance and support their families. Anita Shrivastava, GM(CC&CSR), specifically exhorted the female participants to keep high the momentum, and maintain their financial independence. Partnering with NSDC to carry out these skill training programmes, the beneficiaries were drawn mainly from Below Poverty Line families, placing a special emphasis on skilling girl students. Similar progressive skilling schemes for youth were rolled out in all 9 refineries of IndianOil located in the states of east and north east, north and west of India, benefitting about 2500 youths.last_img read more

Really sad to know how Advaniji and Joshiji has been treated Mamata

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Wednesday criticised BJP for its “ill treatment” towards party veterans L K Adavani and Murli Manohar Moshi and said it is “really sad” to see the way the party is treating its founding members. “Today I spoke to Adavaniji in the morning. I enquired about his health. He said he felt good that I had called him. “It is really sad to see the way BJP is treating its founding members. I don’t want to say much more as it is the internal matter of their party,” Banerjee, who is also the Trinamool Congress supremo said. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja Advani and Joshi have been denied ticket by BJP to contest the upcoming Lok Sabha polls in their states. In an apparent reference to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Main Bhi Chowkidar’ campaign, Banerjee said she has immense respect for real chowkidars and not for political chowkidars who are trying to derive “political mileage” out of it. She also criticised Modi for trying to derive “political mileage” out of the achievements of scientists. “Has Modi gone to space or has he done any research? He is just trying to gain political mileage out of it,” she said on the prime minister’s announcement that the country had demonstrated anti-satellite missile capability by shooting down a live satellite.last_img read more

Sunny morning in Delhi

first_imgNew Delhi: It was a bright and breezy morning in the national capital on Monday with the minimum temperature recorded a notch below the season’s average at 17.6 degrees Celsius. The maximum temperature for the day was likely to hover around 34 degrees Celsius. “The city may witness strong surface wind during the day,” an Indian Meteorological Department official said. At 8.30 a.m. the humidity was recorded at 58 per cent. On Sunday, the maximum temperature was recorded a notch above the season’s average at 34.3 degrees Celsius and the minimum was two notches above at 19 degrees.last_img read more

Mahagathbandhan seeks Modis ouster for his stand on corruption Das

first_imgGumla/Lohardaga (Jharkhand): Jharkhand Chief Minister Raghubar Das has said the grand alliance of opposition parties wants to oust Narendra Modi from power as the Prime Minister has never compromised on corruption. Canvassing for Union minister of State for Tribal Affairs and sitting MP Sudarshan Bhagat in Lohardaga (ST) Lok Sabha seat in Gumla on Thursday, Das said since the prime minister knows about poverty, his battle against corruption is uncompromising. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Referring to the Congress, the JMM and the RJD, the ‘Mahagathbandhan’ partners, the chief minister asked, “How can Rahul Gandhi (Congress president) and Hemant Soren (JMM working president) know about poverty as they are born with silver spoons in their mouth?” They talk about tribals, but back out when steps are taken in the interest of the indigenous people, Das claimed. “These (allies) are the same people who looted sand, gave it to a Mumbai-based contractor, indulged in coal scam and fodder scam,” the BJP leader alleged.last_img read more

Does Tennis Need a Shot Clock

Tennis players are allowed to take 20 seconds before serving at Wimbledon, as they are in all Grand Slam tournaments. Some players think it’s time for this rule to start being enforced — with a “shot clock,” a phrase borrowed from basketball and other sports.“I think it’s the only way to go, to be honest, because how are you supposed to know as a player how long 20 seconds is, or 25 seconds, between a point?” asked Andy Murray, last year’s champion, in a post-match press conference Monday. Two other players — Australian Open champion Stanislas Wawrinka and former world No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki — have also endorsed the idea.The 20-second rule is almost never enforced. Some players complain this gives those who abuse it an unfair advantage, by giving them extra time to recover. Slow play can also turn off fans and disrupt tournament schedules. Yet some players value extra time to gather their thoughts, catch their breath and wipe their brows. The issue starkly divides the men’s game’s two living legends, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, who have comparable career accomplishments but very different paces of play.A first-time violation of the 20-second rule at a Grand Slam match earns merely a warning. The next and all subsequent violations cost a point. But because umpires almost never hand out time violations, players often flout the rule — sometimes dozens of times in a single match.That last sentence is qualitative, not quantitative, because data isn’t readily available. Umpires are supposed to track time between points from their chairs, but unlike other stats and events they monitor during a match — the score, aces, first serves in — time between points isn’t reported as an official stat. And the Grand Slams, the men’s tour and the women’s tour don’t include time violations among player stats.Without an official shot clock to refer to, I took an unofficial one — the stopwatch on my smartphone — to two men’s matches on Centre Court at Wimbledon on Saturday. The first pitted Nadal, known for his slow play, against Mikhail Kukushkin. The second featured Federer, famously fast between points, against Santiago Giraldo.1I counted the time between when the prior point was officially over — the ball landed out of play or bounced twice — and when the server made contact with the ball for his first serve. I didn’t count the time before a player’s first serve in a game, nor his first of two serves in his serving turn in a tiebreaker, nor just after changing sides of the court in a tiebreaker. I didn’t include any serves which were delayed by factors outside the server’s control — such as a challenge to a call, or a loose ball on the court. I also missed a handful of points in Federer-Giraldo because, hey, I’m not a human stopwatch.According to my stopwatch, Kukushkin and especially Nadal were in no hurry, while Federer and Giraldo raced through their encounter. Kukushkin averaged 18.7 seconds before serves, and went over the 20-second limit about one-third of the time. Nadal averaged 22.5 seconds before serves, and went over the limit more than two-thirds of the time.Meanwhile, Federer averaged 15.3 seconds before serves, and went over 20 seconds on just 4 percent of his service points. Giraldo averaged 16.6 seconds, and went over the limit 18 percent of the time.2If Nadal and Kukushkin had played at Giraldo’s pace, their match would have been faster by 13 minutes and 57 seconds. If they’d served at Federer’s pace they would have been done 19 minutes and 9 seconds sooner.The pace of these Saturday matches was particularly relevant because two days earlier, Nadal’s defeated opponent in the second round, Lukas Rosol, complained that Nadal wasn’t penalized for slow play. In his post-match press conference Rosol said, “The referee was not going with the rules.” He added, “Always best players, they’re taking much more than the normal players, you know, and nobody is telling them nothing.”Federer weighed in that same day, saying, “I just think it’s important that we, as players, play up to speed.” He added, “What I don’t want is that we lose viewers because we play too slow” — noting that he recently found himself among such impatient viewers while watching a match on TV. “They were playing so slow I was like, ‘OK, I really — I can’t watch it.’”Raw averages don’t tell the whole story. Perhaps Nadal and Kukushkin were playing bruising rallies that required longer recovery time, or were playing many pivotal points, at deuce or break point. To see which factors were significant drivers of how long players took between points, I cross-referenced each serve with stats that Wimbledon data-provider IBM offers journalists at the tournament: how many strokes the prior rally had, and whether it ended with a winner, an unforced error or a forced error. I also tagged each point as either significant or not. Significant points included any point in which the server trailed — since breaking serve is so rare on Wimbledon’s fast grass — plus 30-all, 40-30, deuce and any advantage or tiebreaker points. Then I combined all the serve timings I had for each player from Saturday’s matches — 302 timings in all, at least 50 for each man. And I ran a series of ANCOVA regressions.It turns out long rallies do make a difference: According to the regressions, each extra stroke in a rally adds about four-tenths of a second to the time the server takes before the next point. The four players also added about two seconds to their pre-serve routine before crucial points. But even after controlling for these factors, the identity of the man serving mattered, too. Kukushkin added about two seconds per serve compared to Federer, while Nadal added seven seconds.3Giraldo didn’t add a significant amount of time, nor did it matter how the prior point ended — by winner, or forced or unforced error — so I removed that from the final analysis. Rally length, importance of points, and the presence of Kukushkin and Nadal all were highly statistically significant (p<0.0005).Many tennis fans know that Federer plays faster than Nadal. The two all-time greats often have been compared on pace of play — such as in this video showing Federer finishing a service game in the time it takes Nadal to play one service point — as well as on more significant accomplishments, such as number of Grand Slam titles won. This analysis, of just one match for each, won’t settle anything — and I have better things to do than time every match.4Federer and Nadal sometimes go against the grain. I timed a handful of their serves in their Tuesday matches. Federer sped through his penultimate service game of his fourth-round match against Tommy Robredo, but he slowed down significantly when serving for the match — not when a man in the crowd yelled out, “Roger, marry me!” but after Robredo won three straight points and threatened to break. Nadal, meanwhile, was brisk, by his standards, late in the second set of his fourth-round match against Nick Kyrgios. In the next set, as he bounced the ball before serving at three games apiece, umpire Carlos Bernardes gave Nadal a time violation — a mere warning Nadal shrugged off to win the point. However, Nadal went on to lose the match in four sets. Without more comprehensive data, the analysis does suggest that Nadal’s pre-serving routine — including toweling off, picking between at least three balls, touching his face and clothing, bouncing the ball and then rocking his body — affects his pace of play more than the punishing rallies he’s known for.There are other, incomplete or indirect indicators of players’ pace of play, many of which corroborate the finding that Nadal takes his time before serving. I’ve stopwatched players at prior Grand Slams and found there, too, that Federer is fast and Nadal is slow. Occasionally television broadcasts report average time between points during matches. “You can see on TV the stat, sometimes the average time is 28 or 30 seconds,” Wawrinka said. Federer was told in his press conference that a broadcast of Nadal-Rosol showed Nadal averaged 25 seconds between points. These stats are unofficial, however, and not recorded or compiled in a systematic way.The crudest method to approximate pace of play is to divide the total time a player is on the court by the number of points he or she plays. Nadal ranks first among men’s tour regulars in time per point, at 46.5 seconds over the last year. Federer is among the fastest, at 38.5 seconds.5The WTA Tour, which governs women’s events outside Slams, doesn’t report as many stats as the men’s ATP World Tour, making comparisons difficult. Also, time between points has been a bigger priority for the ATP, which attempted to crack down on slow play at the start of last year with rule changes and an emphasis on greater enforcement. The WTA, like the Slams, allows 20 seconds before serves at its events.Simply dividing time by points is crude because it doesn’t account for time elapsed during points themselves. It also bundles together Grand Slams — where players get 20 seconds before serving — and tour events, where men get 25 seconds. One indicator that the Slam rules aren’t enforced and aren’t heeded by players: Nadal, Federer and the average man all take longer per point at Grand Slams than at tour events.At Wimbledon, Nadal averaged 40.7 seconds per point, while Federer has averaged 7.2 fewer seconds — with Novak Djokovic and Murray, the other two men to win Wimbledon in the last decade, closer to Nadal’s pace. Again, this measure includes actual tennis, not just time in between tennis. Just 23 percent of rallies in Federer matches through the fourth round extended past four shots, compared to 27 percent for Nadal and 39 percent for Murray.Will Wimbledon take up players’ suggestions for a shot clock? It’s not clear. I saw Pascal Maria, the umpire who presided over the Nadal-Kushkin match, outside Centre Court on Tuesday and asked him about my data and about time violations. He declined to comment. A spokeswoman for the All England Club, which hosts the tournament, told me umpires had handed out 33 time violations as of Tuesday — or fewer than one every six matches. Some of these were mere warnings; she didn’t know how many times players lost points for playing slow. She declined to comment about slow play and the possibility of a shot clock.CORRECTION (July 2, 6:14 p.m.): An earlier version of this article said the analysis consisted of a series of logistic regressions. It was a series of ANCOVA regressions. read more

Jokes over Ohio State needs to give JK Dobbins the ball

Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) runs the ball in the second quarter of the Ohio State-Iowa game on Nov. 4. Ohio State lost 24-55. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe Monday after No. 6 Ohio State’s 39-38 comeback win against Penn State in which freshman running back J.K. Dobbins took 13 carries for 88 yards, head coach Urban Meyer was adamant he would not “micromanage” which backs deserved carries. Two days following the victory, Meyer said he deferred to running backs coach Tony Alford and co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson when determining who carries the ball. Two days after that, Wilson said Alford controlled carry counts and had no idea the total number of carries Dobbins had until he was told because he is a “big-picture guy” and was focused on “getting the offense going.”Dobbins, who leads the team with 119 carries for 914 yards (7.7 yards per carry), carried the ball four times for 50 yards in the first quarter against the Nittany Lions, then did not touch the ball again until the third quarter.In the Buckeyes’ 55-24 loss to Iowa, the issue resurfaced after Dobbins had four carries for 45 yards in the first quarter, but finished the game with just six carries for 51 yards. On Monday, Meyer said the coaches discuss running back carry counts and added he believes the star freshman deserves more touches.Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) warms up prior to the game against Rutgers on Sep. 30. Ohio State won 56-0. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“We have conversation about it,” Meyer said. “If there’s a huge disparity between — I think, [redshirt sophomore Mike Weber is] playing hard. I think J.K. is our starter, had a couple of nice runs. Those are things we talk about. But once again I think coach Alford does a nice job. He should have more than six carries, but we got behind and started throwing it a lot.”Dobbins’ usage against Iowa and inconsistent playing time against Penn State come in stark contrast to his high carry counts at the beginning of the year. Starting in his first-ever collegiate game due to Weber’s injury, the freshman totalled 29 carries for 181 yards, more carries and yards than both Weber or former Ohio State running back Ezekiel Elliott had in their debuts.In six of the next seven games, Dobbins received between 12 and 14 carries. He has not rushed for less than 5.5 yards per carry in a single game. “I want to wear him out,” Meyer said on Oct. 11 following Dobbins’ 13-rush, 96-yard performance against Maryland. “Seriously, I want to wear him out.”That has not happened. In contrast, Ohio State fans have worn themselves out yelling for Dobbins to get more carries.This is not the first time Ohio State’s star skill position player has not consistently received touches. On nearly every occasion, quarterback J.T. Barrett has tallied more carries than the running back or H-back. While Dobbins had just six carries against Iowa, Barrett rushed the ball 14 times for 72 yards, averaging four yards less per carry than the freshman.In Ohio State’s loss to Oklahoma earlier this season, Barrett had 18 carries for 66 yards while Dobbins took 13 carries 72 yards. In the loss to Penn State last year, Barrett had 17 carries for 26 yards while former H-back Curtis Samuel had two rushes for 71 yards and caught six passes for 68 yards. In a 2015 loss to Michigan State, Barrett rushed 15 times for 44 yards while Elliott had 12 carries for 33 yards. Like many other teams during Barrett’s tenure as Ohio State’s quarterback, Iowa focused on keeping the ball out of the running back’s hand and forcing the dual-threat to beat them on the ground. Meyer said he and the offensive coaching staff must figure out how to improve the game plan to get more handoffs to the running backs.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) tosses the ball to freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) in the first quarter of the Ohio State-Iowa game on Nov. 4. Ohio State lost 24-55. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor“A lot of times when you’re struggling, [Barrett running is] your kind of get-out-of-jail-free card,” Meyer said. But Barrett’s increased runs have not got the Buckeyes out of jail. Instead, they take the ball out of the more dynamic playmaker and give it to Barrett who, despite being a dual-threat quarterback, averages 2.6 less yards per carry than Dobbins.Meyer said he prefers his quarterbacks to run between eight and 12 times per game, and noted he does not want Barrett to run as much. However, he also said he and the assistant coaches have talked about whether Ohio State has passed the ball too much in favor of trying to focus on improving the aerial attack, which struggled early in the season.“We discussed that as well,” Meyer said. “Really through about a six-game run there, we were a nice balance as far as run-pass ratio, throwing for a little bit more than we have. But, yeah, that’s much different makeup right now than when we were a heavy, heavy — used to be about a 70 percent run. It’s about 65 [percent run], about 55/45 now.”Ohio State has rushed the ball on just 52.2 percent of its plays this season. Last season, the Buckeyes rushed the ball on 58.8 percent of offensive plays. In Meyer’s four prior seasons, his teams did not run the ball on less than 62.8 percent of its plays.Since Meyer wants less quarterback runs and has considered whether Ohio State has become too pass-happy, only one antidote exists: increased running back carries.It should be an easy change. All Ohio State must do is hand the ball to one of its most explosive skill position players. Yet Meyer has dealt with this issue in years prior and it continues to surface. The time to “micromanage” Dobbins’ carries is not now. It was before Iowa embarrassed Ohio State and eliminated it from playoff contention. read more