Sonnax owner sells to managers

first_imgSonnax Industries,by Kevin Kelley Vermont Business Magazine The co-founder of one of Vermont’s fastest growing manufacturing companies has sold the business to its top two executives.Sonnax, a Bellow Falls automotive parts maker recently named Vermont’s Exporter of the Year, changed hands for an undisclosed sum in a deal announced last week. Neil Joseph, who founded the company with his father in 1978, made the sale along with minority shareholder David Landa.The new owners are Tommy Harmon and David Bedard, who had worked, respectively, as chief operating officer and vice president of sales and marketing. Harmon, who becomes president and CEO, had formed a 50-50 partnership with Bedard, now the company’s chief operating officer.”We really saw this as a great opportunity for my partner and me to continue growing the business,” Harmon said.Sonnax has recorded double-digit growth rates for each of the past few years. And Harmon says he expects expansion to continue at a 10-12 percent annual pace. With 165 employees in Bellows Falls and business operations in 60 countries, Sonnax has revenues of about $36 million a year.It is this performance that led the Vermont Business and Industry Expo to honor Sonnax in May as its Exporter of the Year.The company makes automatic transmission components, including a governing device that Joseph designed around the time that Sonnax was launched.Joseph was unavailable for comment this week, but in an interview in April he attributed the company’s success partly to its recruitment of a multilingual sales staff. “Being able to speak to customers in their own languages helps us greatly in the markets where we want to be,” Joseph said then.He added that Sonnax was committed to staying in Vermont despite the difficulty of hiring locally for some positions. State economic development officials awarded Sonnax $725,000 in tax credits over five years in a successful attempt to persuade the company to expand in Vermont rather than in Tennessee, as it had considered doing. In return, Sonnax said it plans to add 75 workers in the next few years.The new owners told The Rutland Herald that they intend to sustain the company’s policy of paying livable wages. Harmon said no full-time worker makes less than $10 an hour, while the average annual salary exceeds $30,000.Joseph, 48, will stay on as a consultant for the next three years. In a prepared statement, he expressed satisfaction at having sold the business to Harmon and Bedard, “who I believe have the ability to take this company to the next level.”last_img read more

Fiumare – Kvarner Festival of the Sea and Maritime Tradition becomes a kind of time machine in the authentic locations of the Delta – Dead Channel and Verdi Street

first_imgFrom the first post, I emphasize the same thing, let’s respect ourselves, our tradition, identity, culture, history… because only if we respect ourselves, others will respect us. Especially when we talk about tourism, because the very motive of travel is to get to know a new way and culture of living, which draws the logical hypothesis that authenticity is the very essence of tourism.Exactly one such great tourist story takes place in Kvarner, more precisely in Rijeka, as part of “Fiumare” – Kvarner Festival of the Sea and Maritime Tradition, which takes place from May 30 to June 6 in Rijeka. Connecting the maritime and trade tradition of the past with today’s everyday life, Fiumare will once again be a kind of time machine in the authentic locations of the Dead Channel and Verdi Street, and along the Promenade, traditional boats will occupy the entire Rijeka waters and port.The goals of the Fiumara event are the promotion of Rijeka and Kvarner through the presentation and valorization of heritage potentials in the field of maritime, fishing and traditional shipbuilding by organizing a number of attractive events, but also the presentation of Kvarner destinations with their specific eco-ethno products. In addition to preserving and revitalizing the maritime heritage, Fiumari aims to strengthen the potential of cultural tourism in Rijeka, but also to connect Rijeka as a natural and historical center of Kvarner with other destinations, which further valorizes all heritage potentials of the region.Wooden boats on sails anchored in the Dead Channel, traders and craftsmen in traditional costumes from all over Kvarner, interactive workshops of maritime and fishing skills, promotion of old customs, gastronomic offer of indigenous dishes and wines, organized tours of historical locations of the city center, regattas of traditional boats on sails, exhibitions, lectures, open deck days and museums… are just some of the programs offered by Fiumare. Download the Fiumare festival program HEREFiumare – Kvarner Festival of the Sea and Maritime Tradition is becoming a kind of time machine in the authentic locations of the Delta – Dead Channel and Verdi Street – a junction with the market and harbor.Opatija guc OP 552 from 1895 was declared the most original boat of the 7th Fiumare festival”Opatija guc” is a characteristic boat for transporting tourists at a time when oars and wind were used to drive boats. The purpose of this boat was exclusively tourist, so its restoration is very valuable as a reminder of the centuries-old tradition of “barkariola”. Opatija’s guc deserves a return to the regular tourist offer of the Opatija Riviera as a kind of “gondola” of the Riviera, in fact, it is insane that it is not long ago.last_img read more

Benefit 5K April 4 for Andy Lacher of BookStacks

first_img Kickstarter has lots of gray areas – May 5, 2015 Latest Posts BUCKSPORT — There will be a benefit 5K race to benefit BookStacks owner Andy Lacher Saturday, April 4, at Bucksport High School.Lacher suffered a Christmas Eve fall, ripping four tendons in his knee and crushing his ankle. Supporters have organized several fund-raising events to help cover his uninsured medical expenses.The 5K (3.1-mile) event will include “Legs for Lacher” for runners and “Lacher’s Walkers” for walkers.“Legs for Lacher” will be a timed event, with prizes awarded to top finishers. General prize drawings will be held for all participants, and grand prizes for top fund raisers will also be awarded after the race.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textRegistration is at 8 a.m. and the 5K will start at 9.The tax-deductible entrance fee is $10 for adults and $8 for students. Registration forms and sponsor sheets are available at BookStacks and other area businesses, or they can be printed from www.sub5.com online.Completed forms can be dropped off at BookStacks, or mailed to Kristin McDermott, 4 Cedar St., Bucksport, ME 04416. Participants may also register on race day. The first 50 participants will receive a free nylon drawstring bag. Everyone can order a bag or T-shirt on race day.McDermott is now seeking volunteers, cash donations and prize offerings from the community. Contact kristinit@myfairpoint.net or 469-3801.There will be a spaghetti supper benefit the night before the race at Duffy’s Restaurant in Orland. Latest posts by Nicole Ouellette (see all) Ask Nicole: What do I do about ignorant Internet commenters? – April 21, 2015center_img Nicole OuelletteColumnist at Breaking Even CommunicationsWhen Nicole isn’t giving advice she’s completely unqualified to give, she runs an Internet marketing company in Bar Harbor, where she lives with her husband Derrick and their short dog Gidget. She loves young adult novels, cooking and talking French to anyone who’ll talk back. asknicole@ellsworthamerican.com Hold the pickles and the piercings, please – April 28, 2015 Biolast_img read more