Blake impresses in world leading 100m win

first_imgOn a day when American Justin Gatlin dropped a wind-aided 9.90 seconds run in The Bahamas, 2011 World 100m champion Yohan Blake signalled his return after injury issues, with a world leading 9.95 (+1.4) win in the 100m at the MVP Track and field meet at the National Stadium on Saturday night. Blake, who has been bothered with hamstring injuries, which caused him to miss the 2013 World Championships and much of the subsequent seasons, confirmed whispers out of his training camp, which pointed to an athlete in good shape, after bursting out of the blocks and out-sprinting a solid field. 200m specialist Rasheed Dwyer and Zharnel Hughes both clocked 10.10 seconds for second and third respectively. Earlier, Gatlin, while competing at the Chris Brown Bahamas Invitational at the Thomas A Robinson Stadium in Nassau, stopped the clock in 9.90 seconds but had an illegal +2.3 wind pushing him along. Qatar’s Femi Ogundoe, was second in 9.94 with Trinidad and Tobago’s Adrian Griffith taking third in 10.03. Also in The Bahamas, veteran Jamaican sprinter Veronica Campbell-Brown had to settle for third place in the women’s 100m, 11.17 in a  tight finish behind Trinidadian Michelle-Lee Ahye, 11.14 and Murielle Ahoure (Ivory Coast), 11.17. Another Jamaican Aleen Bailey fell during the early stages of the race and was reportedly taken to hospital after hitting her head on the track. Quarter-miler LaShawn Merritt was a highlight at the meet, stopping the clock in a brilliant 19.78 (+0.9) to win the 200m event. Wallace Spearmon, 20.40 was next best with Mike Rodgers 20.42 finishing third, while Jamaica’s Jason Livermore was fifth in 21.01.last_img read more

Lofa Association in Grand Gedeh Launched

first_imgA group of Liberians hailing from Lofa County residing in Grand Gedeh on New Year’s Day inaugurated the Lofa Association of Grand Gedeh.The group, headed by Mrs. Musu Tamba, said the Association was organized in July 2013 with the aim of building a community of united Lofa natives in Grand Gedeh.Mrs. Tamba said the group comprises more than two hundred members who are engaged in businesses across Grand Gedeh County.Members of the association include dealers in building materials, used clothing and household utensils among other commodities and those engaged in gold mining, according to Mrs. Tamba.She added that the Association seeks to empower its members by providing loans and other assistance to their fellow compatriots.She disclosed that the group also aims to impact the county’s economy by what she described as “the opening of fabulous businesses.”Mrs. Tamba, who is one of the leading building materials dealers in Zwedru, said members also rally to provide support to those who get married, graduate, celebrate birthdays and other achievements in their lives. The Lofa association also provides help to the sick and impoverished members, she added.She disclosed plans to engage in large scale farming in Grand Gedeh in the coming years.“Prior to the civil war, Lofa County was referred to as the breadbasket of Liberia. Now we have over two hundred of us living in Grand Gedeh and I know we can put Grand Gedeh on the map as the leading producer of bitter balls and pepper in the near future,” Mrs. Tamba said.She said they have a very cordial relationship with the people of Grand Gedeh and the county’s authorities. The launch of the Lofa Association of Grand Gedeh was attended by people from all walks of life, including Grand Gedeh Acting County Inspector Josephus Garley, a representative from the Zwedru City Mayor’s office, the Grebo, Nimba and business communities.Some of the members of the association have been working and doing business in Grand Gedeh for over 25 years.The Lofa association is an addition to a network of other tribal groups residing in the county. There are the Fulani communities, Nimba citizens, Grebo community and Kru associations in Grand Gedeh.The festivity, which included a parade through the principal streets of Zwedru and an indoor program, was graced by musician Patrick Tamba Kailando, a Lofa native who also performs his music in Guinea and Sierra Leone. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Clever Animals Inspire Lookers – And Engineers

first_img     How did these optical secrets emerge in such different species as arthropods, fish and birds?  The leader of the Israeli group remarked, “It is astonishing how through evolution, fish and silver-colored spiders have independently succeeded in achieving light-reflecting structures with similar efficiencies, although differences in mechanism is apparent.”  Another team member who spoke of the “clever solutions that emerged in the course of evolution” said, “It is very surprising that fish and spiders, pertaining to completely different taxonomic groups, independently acquired through evolution the ability to generate mirror-like reflections on their skin by depositing guanine crystals.  This suggests that the solution must be quite efficient and it is, therefore, extremely promising for the materials scientists to try and understand the structural principles of these photonic crystals working as (colored) mirrors.” 1.  Finn, Tregenza and Norman, “Defensive tool use in a coconut-carrying octopus,” Current Biology, Volume 19, Issue 23, R1069-R1070, 15 December 2009, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2009.10.052. Ahem, you Israeli idolaters: Darwinism has just been falsified, not confirmed.  What’s astonishing is that you would trade in a solid foundation for an idol with feet of clay.  Look to the Rock from which you were hewn.     How often do the evolutionists start chanting their worship rituals into otherwise stimulating discussions about biological wonders?  It will be so good when we can get science back to observation.  Meanwhile, all of us can look forward to cool gadgets and inventions coming from the intelligent-design science of biomimetics. In the tank, fish are glistenin’ In the lab, folks are whistlin’; A beautiful sight, we’re happy tonight, Copyin’ a living wonderland. Gone away’s Mr. Charlie, Here to stay – not so gnarly – Intelli-design, the trend of ’09, Copyin’ a living wonderland. In the hangar we can build a robot, And pretend that it’s a hummingbird; They’ll say “Follow Darwin!” we’ll say “No, not! Design by evolution is absurd.” Later on, we’ll conspire As we dream, zoo-inspired, To build unafraid, with plans that God made, Copyin’ a living wonderland.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Incredible animals provide endless delights with their antics.  Even microorganisms are capable of amazing feats.  Sometimes these living things inspire inventors, too.center_img Coconut octopus:  Tool use was supposed to be a late marker of primate intelligence as chimpanzees were evolving upward to manhood.  That’s so 1890.  Now that we know crows can use tools (05/26/2009), why not octopi?  Sure enough, PhysOrg, Science Daily and Live Science all reported on a “lucky accident” of finding “tool use in an invertebrate.”  Based on the paper in Current Biology,1 Live Science explained, “The veined octopus (Amphioctopus marginatus) apparently can stack discarded coconut shell halves just as one might pile bowls, sits atop them, makes its eight arms rigid like stilts, and then moves the entire heap across the seafloor.  These soft-bodied creatures perform this ungainly ‘stilt walking’ to use the hard shells for shelter later when needed.”     Marine biologist Julian Finn “never laughed so hard underwater” upon observing the trick.  New Scientist included a video; so did National Geographic, which said the discoverers were “blown away” when they saw it.  “Tool use, once thought to be a uniquely human behavior, is seen as a sign of considerable mental sophistication among nonhuman animals, ”NG said.  The article quoted a chimpanzee expert commenting, “Even chimps do not use natural materials to create shelters over their heads.”  This octopus is making good use of its sophisticated robotic arms (02/09/2005, brain (10/25/2009) and complex eyes (10/16/2006, bullet 2).  Live Science followed up with a list of 10 animals that use tools.  Only half of them are primates; two are non-mammals. Hummingbird robots:  Who isn’t fascinated with hummingbirds hovering around the backyard feeder?  Scientists at University of Buffalo are studying “hummingbirds flight to develop self-propelled surveillance devices,” reported PhysOrg.  Hummingbird wings develop 3-D vortices that provide optimal lift.  Scientists interested in designing small robotic flyers that can negotiate caves, tunnels and tight places are taking their cues from the world’s smallest birds.  “One solution being explored is the design of tiny, flying surveillance devices called micro-air vehicles that are bio-inspired, based on lessons drawn from the behavior of insects and birds.” Batty feet:  Scientists thought some bats used suction to cling to wet leaves.  Nope; Science Daily reported that the sucker-footed bats don’t use suction.  “Instead, they use wet adhesion, secreting a fluid, possibly sweat, that enables the pads on the bats’ wrists and ankles to attach to surfaces.”  The report on PhysOrg includes a video of the bat clinging to glass. Microfuel and micro-art:  Even single-celled organisms have their own tricks of technology.  Energy is, of course, a matter of great concern these days.  Space.com reported on the latest attempts to use algae for biofuel.  And New Scientist posted a gallery of artistic patterns produced by microbes (some with human help).  Image No. 7 is sure to give you a double-take.  And say: if bacteria are so clever, why not just use them instead of imitating them?  PhysOrg reported about scientists at Argonne National Laboratory who are harnessing microbes to turn nanoscopic gears.  This is easier than building nanomachines from scratch: There exists a wide gap between man-made hard materials and living tissues; biological materials, unlike steel or plastics, are “alive.”  Biomaterials, such as live skin or tissue, consume energy of the nutrients to self-repair and adapt to their environment,” [Igor] Aronson said.  “Our discovery demonstrates how microscopic swimming agents, such as bacteria or man-made nanorobots, in combination with hard materials can constitute a ‘smart material’ which can dynamically alter its microstructures, repair damage, or power microdevices.” Hopefully PETA will not complain about making them into galley slaves.  See also Live Science. All that glitters:  Photonic crystals, the geometric arrangements of nanoscopic surfaces that play tricks with light, are still a hot topic in physics and biomimetics.  PhysOrg reported about work at the Weizmann Institute of Science who are studying “Sparkly Spiders and Photonic Fish.”  A variety of unrelated creatures use guanine molecules to create the tiny patterns that amplify some wavelengths and cancel out others.  The result is a reflective surface brighter than what pigments could produce: “These fish and spiders are able to make guanine crystals of very specific size and orientation to achieve the reflectivity they require.”last_img read more

Heavy Rains Continue to Impact Roadways in Several Parishes

first_imgStory Highlights Several roads across the island continue to be impacted by the inclement weather. Manager, Communication and Customer Services at the NWA, Stephen Shaw says that some progress was made today in removing landslides and washed down silt from affected corridors, however, more work is needed. Over in St. Thomas, flooding is impacting the roads through Poormans Corner, Hordley Crossing, Bowden, Lieth Hall, Elshamar and Port Morant. A fallen tree is affecting vehicular commute along the Trinityville main road, while heavy equipment has been deployed to clear a heavy deposit of silt from the corridor leading from Bull Bay to Grants Pen. PRESS RELEASE – Several roads across the island continue to be impacted by the inclement weather.Teams from the National Works Agency (NWA) have been responding to rain related issues, in the parishes of St. Andrew, St. Thomas, St. Elizabeth, Hanover, Trelawny and Westmoreland.Manager, Communication and Customer Services at the NWA, Stephen Shaw says that some progress was made today in removing landslides and washed down silt from affected corridors, however, more work is needed.The heavy rains have continued across the island and this has stymied the efforts.In St. Andrew, landslides have been impacting the road through the Mavis Bank community.The Bull Bay main road, which was earlier today being affected by a heavy deposit of silt has been cleared. Landslides are also impacting sections of Gordon Town Road, the stretch from Stony Hill to Toms River as well as the Rock Hall and Mount Pleasant communities.Roads through these areas are passable, however caution is being advised.Mr. Shaw says that additional heavy equipment has been dispatched to the main road from Papine to Hardwar Gap, which is blocked at sections.Over in St. Thomas, flooding is impacting the roads through Poormans Corner, Hordley Crossing, Bowden, Lieth Hall, Elshamar and Port Morant. A fallen tree is affecting vehicular commute along the Trinityville main road, while heavy equipment has been deployed to clear a heavy deposit of silt from the corridor leading from Bull Bay to Grants Pen.The road from Windsor Forest to Mahagony Vale is also badly scoured, making vehicular commute difficult.Mr. Shaw is also reporting that flooding continues to impact roads through the communities of Three Miles River, Chantilly and Little London in Westmoreland.Motorists are being urged to exercise extreme caution in travelling near the old Little London Police Station as significant flooding is impacting that area.The Stettin to Highgate Hall main road in the communities of Wire Fence, Allsides and Wait-A-Bit in Trelawny are still open to single lane traffic. Flood –waters that had been affecting the Ramble main road in Hanover is also receding. This corridor is opened to single lane traffic.The NWA continues to urge members of the motoring public to proceed with caution along corridors, especially in light of the heavy rains.last_img read more