Foul play? Curious Derick questions timing of rejection for CONCACAF presidency

first_imgPresident of the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) Gordon Derrick has expressed disappointment following the rejection of his candidacy for the CONCACAF presidency, this after FIFA announced he had failed an integrity check.In a media release issued yesterday, Gordon, who also serves as the president of the Antigua and Barbuda Football Association, noted that he found his non-admittance for the CONCACAF presidential election odd given what he termed the minute nature of the cited offence.CONCACAF, the football authority for the North America, Central America and Caribbean region, is expected to elect a new president on May 12 in Mexico City. CONCACAF’s president is automatically a FIFA vice-president and is a member of the organisation’s executive committee, which will be known as the FIFA Council.Derrick outlined that he received a letter from FIFA’s Audit and Compliance Committee chairman, Domenico Scala, on April 12, 2016, which informed him that he could not be admitted as a candidate for the election of the office of FIFA vice-president.He further noted that the correspondence cited a November 17, 2011 reprimand in the wake of the Mohammed Bin Hamman matter, which saw several regional football leaders fined and charged with receiving cash payments during Bin Hamman’s failed bid to become FIFA president.BARRED FROM CONTESTINGDerrick noted with interest that he is being barred from contesting for the post for what he deems a minor offence.”Mr Domenico Scala cited a November 17, 2011 reprimand following the Bin Hammam matter, for which I was fined CHF 300, and an ongoing investigation that began over a year ago, on March 6, 2015. I find it curious that the reprimand of 2011 was too minute to warrant an appeal and further that the principal person in the matter was vindicated upon his appeal, yet this was deemed significant enough to derail my candidacy,” read Derrick’s statement.”It is equally interesting that the investigation opened against me by the FIFA Ethics Committee has been prolonged for over a year and was used as the second plank upon which I was disqualified. Given the series of events leading up to this announcement, I am not surprised, but I am nonetheless disappointed and concerned,” Derrick said before stating that he is now considering his options.”This disappointment and concern is not just for myself. It extends to football in the region and the course our development agenda seems set to take. I am carefully considering my next move and hope to make a more comprehensive statement in due course,” the statement continued.The development means that Bermuda’s Larry Mussenden and Canada’s Victor Montagliani are the remaining candidates for the CONCACAF presidency.CONCACAF’s last three presidents – Austin ‘Jack’ Warner, Jeffrey Webb and Alfredo Hawit – have all been booted for their alleged involvement in the corruption scandal that has rocked FIFA.last_img read more

3 unsung heroes behind the 49ers’ perfect record

first_imgWhile, … It took a few weeks, but the 49ers have turned skeptics into believers after manhandling the Rams 20-7 Sunday to move to 5-0 on the season.In the Niners’ rise from the team that picked No. 2 overall last year to a bonafide playoff contender, there’s plenty of praise to be passed around.But here are three players that I think deserve more:Jaquiski Tartt(Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)Let’s be real: the MVP of the Niners’ defense is really coordinator Robert Saleh.last_img read more

Chef cooks up a way out of trouble

first_imgKelvin Joel (far right) and his group of student chefs at the food garden at the Westbury Youth Center. (Image: Johannesburg Culinary and Pastry School) There is nothing like someone who has done wrong and then turns his life around and does something right to make sure future generations do not walk he path he walked.Such a person is Kelvin Joel, pastry chef, co-owner of the Johannesburg Culinary and Pastry School, and recipient of the South African Chefs Association’s 2010 Achievement Award.A youngster with no guidance, Joel got mixed up in drugs in his youth. But he is now making sure the youngsters in his home suburb of Westbury, in western Johannesburg, do not get enticed by the allure of selling drugs to escape poverty.“Everyone who lived there had challenges at home and school,” he said, “even the community itself. I got an opportunity to change my life.”Joel started his Chefs Project in 2013 to give these and other troubled youth an opportunity to change their lives through cooking, if they wanted to do so. “Basically, cheffing changed my life. There are youngsters out there who would also like to do it, but don’t have the opportunity. So we want to create the opportunity for them to excel.“We just try to guide them to make it easier for them to understand. In the fast-paced industry everyone just works to get their job done, and interns don’t get a chance to ask questions. Now they can see if they really want to be a chef, acquire a skill and then have something to sell.”Watch Joel at explain his childhood and the origins of the Johannesburg Culinary and Pastry School :Are you playing your part in transforming South Africa? If so, submit your story or video and let us know what you are doing to improve the country for all.last_img read more

Ohio AgrAbility at FSR

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Getting older or injured generally won’t stop a farmer from working.But work does not have to be painful. Changes can be made to a tractor or a combine, such as adding a lift to get aboard them more easily or adding a camera to keep a farmer from having to turn his or her head to see behind.Injured or aging farmers can find the technology they need to continue to work through Ohio State University Extension’s Ohio AgrAbility program. The program offers free on-site assessments for people with a disability, to help determine what assistive technology might enable them to continue to work. Ohio AgrAbility will offer three daily workshops at FSR to discuss what’s available for farmers who are injured or struggling with a physical disability and don’t want to give up farming.Two of the workshops Ohio AgrAbility will offer are on modifications to farm equipment, and another workshop is for professionals who work with individuals with disabilities. All workshops will take place under the Ohio AgrAbility tent on Land Avenue between Market and Kottman streets. The daily workshops for those who work with individuals with disabilities, which will be at 1:30 p.m., will provide an overview of what Ohio AgrAbility offers.The farm modifications workshops, which will be at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. daily, will address what changes can be made to farm equipment to allow farmers to use equipment effectively without causing undue strain or additional injuries.Laura Akgerman, disability services coordinator for the AgrAbility program, will also present “Gardening and Farming with Arthritis — It Doesn’t Have to Hurt” at the Small Farm Center Sept. 20 at 10:30 a.m., and “Gardening with Arthritis” at the Utzinger Garden Sept. 19 and 21 at 10 a.m.Under the Ohio AgrAbility tent, people can see motorized doors for a barn, a motorized chair specially made to ride through rough terrain and a modified lawn mower that has shock absorbers to prevent a bumpy ride.“People might think ‘I don’t have a disability. I don’t need to know this.’ But we all get older,” said Akgerman.The assistive technology that will be discussed could be helpful to anyone, even those without a disability, Akgerman said. All farmers might benefit from having hand rails on a tractor or combine or a new seat with a suspension system that offers a smoother ride, she said.“If you could avoid an injury or chronic condition that aggravates your back or shoulders, causes you pain, or limits your productivity, why wouldn’t you?” Akgerman asked.One of the aims of the AgrAbility program is helping injured farmers keep from getting secondary injuries. For example, a farmer who struggles with arthritis or hip pain might find it challenging to climb up into the tractor, and in attempting to do so, could fall and possibly break a rib or another bone, said Charlie Landis, Ohio AgrAbility’s rural rehabilitation coordinator.“Farming is one of the more dangerous occupations in the country due to the amount of equipment on the farm and because farmers are working with animals and machinery with a lot of moving parts,” Landis said.An increasing number of farmers are aging, and as farmers get older, the odds of them injuring themselves increase, Landis pointed out.“People have to realize that they’re just not as strong or as quick as they used to be, but there are ways they can keep farming despite their injury, illness or disability,” he said.Ohio AgrAbility is a program provided through OSU Extension in partnership with Easter Seals Greater Cincinnati.last_img read more