Mike Tindall fined £25,000 and kicked out of England squad

first_imgEngland’s Mike Tindall attends the captain’s run training session on the eve of the 2011 Rugby World Cup match pool B between Argentina and England at Otago stadium in Dunedin on September 9, 2011 . AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS One expensive night out – Tindall thrown out of the England Squad and fined £25 000THE Rugby Football Union has taken the following disciplinary action regarding breaches of the England Elite Player Squad Agreement during the 2011 Rugby World Cup:Mike Tindall has been removed from the England Elite Player Squad with immediate effect and fined £25,000 for his conduct around the events that took place in Queenstown on the night of Sunday, September 11, 2011Chris Ashton has been fined £5,000 (fine suspended until December 31, 2012), for his part in the events in Dunedin on Friday, September 9, 2011 and warned as to his future conductJames Haskell has been fined £5,000 (fine suspended until December 31, 2012), for his part in the events in Dunedin on  Friday, September 9, 2011 and warned as to his future conductDylan Hartley has been cleared of being involved in the exchange of inappropriate language which led to allegations of wrongdoing against himself, Chris Ashton and James Haskell, in Dunedin on  Friday, September 9, 2011The sanctions follow appearances by the players before the RFU’s Professional Rugby Director Rob Andrew and Legal and Governance Director Karena Vleck.Rob Andrew said: “We have considered all the evidence carefully and interviewed the players at length. These actions have not been taken lightly but we believe that in all these cases the sanctions are commensurate with the level of seriousness of what occurred.“Mike Tindall’s actions reached a level of misconduct that was unacceptable in a senior England player and amounted to a very serious breach of the EPS Code of Conduct.  Whilst we acknowledge his previous good character it needs to be made clear that what he did will not be tolerated.“Regarding the events in Dunedin, it should be stressed that the allegations of very serious wrong-doing made against Chris Ashton, Dylan Hartley and James Haskell by Annabel Newton, a member of staff at the team hotel, were entirely false. We do not believe the players had any intention to sexually harass or intimidate Ms Newton. “However, the incident is precisely the kind of dangerous, compromising situation the players were warned about prior to departure for New Zealand and that they were specifically told to avoid in the EPS Code of Conduct.“While we found that Dylan Hartley played no part in the ill-considered exchange with Annabel Newton, Chris Ashton and James Haskell’s behaviour on September 9 did breach the EPS Code of Conduct and they have each been given suspended fines of £5,000. If they commit any further breaches of the Code before December 31, 2012 the fines will become due.“Finally, these episodes and the subsequent disciplinary action should stand as a strong reminder that the highest standards of personal conduct are expected from any England player on and off the field.” The players have the right to appeal to the RFU Acting Chief Executive within three working days from today.The RFU will not be making any further comment about the above action.last_img read more

The legacy of the Lions

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BAGSHOT, ENGLAND – MAY 19: Warren Gatland, the Lions forward coach instructs the squad during the British and Irish Lions training session held at Pennyhill Park on May 19, 2009 in Bagshot, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Warren’s winners: Who will Gatland pick in his Lions’ line-up next summer in Australia?IN LESS than a year Warren Gatland will take a squad of the best players from England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales to Australia, with the aim of becoming the first Lions side to win a Test series since 1997. Rugby fans across the British Isles are already picking their Test XVs, but what does it mean to be selected for a Lions tour? A few of those who have donned the famous red jersey explain how it feels…last_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: Round Three Talking Points

first_imgNORTHAMPTON, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 07: Paddy Jackson of Ulster looks on during the Heineken Cup match between Northampton Saints and Ulster at Franklin’s Gardens on December 7, 2012 in Northampton, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Now, though, Philippe Saint-Andre has opted to pick men in positions that suit them and has wisely slid Wesley Fofana into his natural home at inside centre, pairing him with the runaway pie-cart Mathieu Bastareaud for the first time.England have made changes of their own, with the creative Billy Twelvetrees making way for Brad Barritt at inside-centre and Manu Tuilagi coming on his outside to give Bastareaud food for thought and importantly present enthralled viewers with their seismic collisions in glorious hi-def.Sure Bastareaud versus Tuilagi may just offer more bang than a homemade Hadron Collider but on the fringes, however, both sides have artistes in Fofana, Vincent Clerc, Chris Ashton and Alex Goode who will scurry around, trying to ride the shockwaves.Chess boxing at MurrayfieldTactical focus: Paddy JacksonThe hybrid sport of chess boxing, unsurprisingly a French invention, involves alternate rounds of tactical gameplay and fighting. Two different disciplines are needed, with forward panning and guile mixed in with athletic clobbering.This seems an apt metaphor for Scotland v Ireland. Ireland may be missing several key men, Jonny Sexton, Simon Zebo and Mike McCarthy, to name but a few, yet they will feel they can derail Scotland if they dominate the breakdown and the Scots will just want to tear it up after so much dizzying success against Italy. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Centre stage: Wesley Fofana is finally brought into the centres to face England, alongside burly BastareaudBy Alan DymockREADY THE ice baths. Warm the pies. Give a last-minute rousing team talk to the terrified beer vendors, steeling themselves for battle. The RBS 6 Nations is back from its short hiatus and the brutality begins again. Get excited. Get very excited!Wales backrow unchallengedHidden work: flanker Ryan JonesWhat a difference a win makes. Rob Howley looks like a man regenerated with that magic anti-ageing cream money can’t buy; relief. The Wales squad looks hungry but happy. Now all they need is a few more winning episodes and Oil of Olay will undoubtedly come knocking.The night raid against Les Bleus showed a determination and a self-belief that bent the game their way and the lethargic French had no choice but to succumb. Now the Welsh travel to Rome with the same starting line-up –named a week early in a propaganda power play –and a bench boasting Sam Warburton and Alun Wyn Jones, brimming with class.In their backrow Ryan Jones steered Wales gallantly, scrapping for turnovers, carrying in the tight and even putting in a deft touch finder that would grace Swansea’s Wembley bow this weekend, Justin Tipuric has made sure his fan club in Wales now outnumbers that of his namesake, Mr Timberlake, and Toby Faletau carried reliably and forcefully. Against Italy they face a backrow without the talismanic Sergio Parisse, while still boasting abrasive workaholics like Alessandro Zanni and Simon Favaro.Here is where the game could be decided. No 8 Manoa Vosawai is not Parisse, but he will readily run at Faletau, and vice versa. Faletau should edge that battle as the game wears on, especially as Vosawai has been in the cooler for a few weeks after a red card. This will likely be indicative of the game as a whole.Centre swapDespite all the talk of settling and building on the efficient vanquishing of Australia in the autumn, France have been as steady as your average Harlem Shake. Much of this has come down to selecting players out of position. However, The Scottish back three will be wanting loose kicks and far-flung passes coming their way and the Irish half backs will be wanting to utilise territorial nudging and landing the ball in unguarded green spaces.The shape and probably result of this game will come down to how much clean ball there is, but also how much play Paddy Jackson and Conor Murray allow in front of them.last_img read more

Olo Brown

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The foundation stone on which New Zealand’s great pack of the 1990s was built, Olo Brown was one of the finest props world rugby has seen, but also one of the game’s most low-profile superstars as he shunned press conferences and interviews.Born in Apia, Samoa, he emerged from Mount Albert Grammar School in Auckland with good enough academic results to become a chartered accountant and good enough rugby skills to oust Peter Fatialofa from the Auckland side in 1989, when Brown was only 21.A year later, the Ponsonby prop was summoned from a New Zealand Development tour of Canada as injury cover for the All Blacks’ tour of France, but didn’t earn his first Test cap until June 1992. Once he was in the side, Brown proved unmovable in more ways than one, and missed just a single Test in the next six years, when he was rested against Japan during the 1995 World Cup.Alongside Sean Fitzpatrick, Steve McDowell, and later Craig Dowd, he anchored the scrum as they replicated their Auckland form on the Test stage. The All Blacks website pays this tribute: “He was the cornerstone of the pack. With his technique and straightness of back, he was rated by scrummaging experts as one of the finest props to play for New Zealand at any time. His provincial and Test team-mate, Sean Fitzpatrick, swore by his prowess and few scrums anchored by Brown were ever bettered.” Brown finished on the winning side in 40 of his 56 Tests, including a series victory against the Lions in 1993 and nine wins out of 14 over both South Africa and Australia. He was the first All Blacks prop to reach 50 caps.When the game turned professional he continued his accountancy work, but still played the first three seasons of Super Rugby with the Blues, winning the title in 1996 and 1997.center_img Major teams: Ponsonby, AucklandCountry: New Zealand
Test span: 1992-98New Zealand caps: 56 (56 starts)Test points: 20 (4T) Brown’s career was ended abruptly by a neck and back injury he suffered against the Springboks in 1998. Typically, this media-shy giant never officially announced his retirement.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Five talking points in rugby from August

first_imgThe Rugby Championship heavily influenced the narrative in August and yet again it was the All Blacks who once again led from the front while Australia and the Springboks waned… Calling the shots: Beauden Barrett’s superlative form has seen him wrestle the 10 jersey from Aaron Cruden Beauden Barrett – the quadruple threat playerAfter Beauden Barrett’s performances in August it seems unfathomable that there was even a debate as to who would wear the ten shirt for the All Blacks. His displays in the first two tests against the Wallabies were simply awesome. A true example of a triple threat individual who can run, kick and pass – a skillset that all of the best outside halves have. But Barrett takes it one step further beyond the third dimension and into the fourth.Threat: All Black Beauden Barrett has a multi-faceted skillsetBarrett is one of the few outside halves who have the top end speed of a test wing – rumoured to be under 11 seconds over 100m which is rapid when you consider that Bryan Habana, in his prime, recorded 10.6. Whereas most test fly halves make the line break and then require a supporting runner to make the second line break to finish the try, Barrett can finish the whole thing on his own – often leaving the last defender as if they have made eye to eye contact with Medusa herself. Awesome Mr Barrett.Pumas and the new world orderWhilst Zebre and Treviso being dropped into an elite competition has proved largely damaging for both themselves and their respective league, the addition of the Pumas into The Rugby Championship (TRC) has been a rampant success. A team which once only had a scrum, a maul and a goal kicker is now playing the most attractive rugby outside of New Zealand. The predicted whipping boys of the TRC have now ripped the said whip from those at SANZAAR and are using it to hand out a few sound thrashings of their own.New world order: Argentina gave the Springboks two torrid games last monthThe Pumas were valiant in defeat against the Boks in Nelspruit and delivered a set of core numbers that would be the envy of any top five nation – whilst the try which they scored in the 24th minute would be the envy of even the All Blacks. All of which was rounded off with a win over the Boks in the second round where they made nearly twice as many line breaks as the Boks – 18 in total. This was their third victory in what is the hardest tournament in the world and rest assured it won’t be their last.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The cross kick is no longer a riskA decade ago the ‘cross kick’ was deemed a last resort in rugby union. A risky play from the cross pollination of union and league which occurred in the mid 1990’s. Well it is no longer a risk in union, it is a must. You only need look at the efficiency with which Beauden Barrett executes the option for New Zealand, Sanchez and Hernandez for Argentina and Colin Slade’s effort in Pau’s recent game against Toulon, to see just how necessary it is in modern rugby.No risk: Juan Martin Hernandez is a keen proponent of the cross kickTo cross the width of the field with the ball in hand requires a minimum of four passes, not to mention the handling and contact errors that can occur in between – the cross kick requires one precision kick and one precision catch to eliminate four to five defenders. And with the increasing height of modern wingers, the crosskick is likely to almost become the third set piece in rugby.Sam Whitelock and Brodie Retallick are still the benchmarkThere are many good second row combinations in world rugby. Maro Itoje and George Kruis, Alun-Wyn Jones and Luke Charteris to name but two. However, as August proved, Sam Whitelock and Brodie Retallick remain unrivalled. Whilst their lineout work, ruck clearing and defence are a given (they made 28 tackles between them in Bledisloe One, missing just a single hit) it is their ball handling that sets them apart from the rest – Retallick completed three more passes than even Israel Dagg in the First Test.Tag team: Brodie Retallick and Sam Whitelock form a hugely effective lock pairingThey may wear four and five on their back, but their hands and feet are that of a six and seven. Retallick’s ability to bounce the first tackle and offload through the central channels is hugely important in the All Black’s gameplan. Whilst Whitelock’s ankle high pickup and pass ‘through the back’ of two Wallaby defenders in the first Bledisloe test was the equal of Dynamo’s sleight of hand. Whitelock and Retallick remain on the throne, leaving the rest very much sitting on the bench.Wallabies hit rock bottom.Losing a three test tour to England could be considered a blip. A massive blip, but one that may have been an anomaly. To be absolutely annihilated by the All Blacks, at home, in Bledisloe One is quite another. We must of course take into consideration the injuries which blighted their backline – few teams could cope with losing Matt Giteau (ankle), Matt Toomua (neck/head) and Rob Horne (shoulder), but unless Michael Cheika had something weird up his sleeve, even weirder than a listening device, it’s doubtful that any of the above would have jumped in the lineout or added much weight to the maul and scrum.Shellshocked: The Wallabies have had a woeful summer, losing five games in a rowThe Wallaby lineout was so unstable that it seemed as though Stephen Moore must have posted the calls on Facebook the night before. The Wallabies only managed to make two line breaks compared to the All Blacks’ 22, largely due to the fact that Tevita Kuridrani had to get through an incredible defensive workload – completing 17 hits and missing none. The Wallabies were more competitive in Bledisloe Two, but nowhere near the standard required from one of the great test nations. The Wallabies are bottom of the table after two games, with a points difference of -54, and currently the famous Wallaby gold is starting to look like the stuff you can buy from a street vendor in Magaluf.last_img read more

Tras una discusión ‘muy ardua’, se crea un cargo en…

first_img Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 22, 2013 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Clifton Daniel, Obispo provisional de la Diócesis de Pensilvania, que también es miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo, en el momento de recibir el cáliz, el 16 de octubre, de manos de Ron Fox, miembro de la Federación de Seminarios Bexley Seabury. Miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo participaban del oficio semanal de Santa Comunión en la sede de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América en los suburbios de Chicago. La federación de seminarios se encuentra en el edificio de la IELA. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Chicago, Illinois] En el día de clausura de su reunión del 15 al 17 de octubre en esta ciudad, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal convino en dedicar parte de un inesperado ingreso en el presupuesto 2013-2015 a una nueva plaza en la sede denominacional dedicada a la justicia y la reconciliación raciales, una decisión a la que se llegó luego de un debate, a veces tenso pero siempre contenido.El Consejo también ratificó el reto que le planteara a la Iglesia en febrero de 2010 de recaudar $10 millones para la campaña de reconstrucción de la Diócesis Episcopal de Haití. Llamó a todas las partes de la Iglesia a renovar su apoyo al empeño continuo de reconstruir la diócesis al acercarse el cuarto aniversario de que el país resultara diezmado por un terremoto de magnitud 7 el 12 de enero de 2010.Los miembros del Consejo le pidieron a su Comité Permanente Conjunto de Finanzas para la Misión que contemplara incluir dinero del presupuesto actual para el Proyecto de Reconstrucción de la catedral de la Santa Trinidad e instó al Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F) a incluir la financiación del proyecto en el presupuesto trienal 2016-2018.La Resolución WM017 le pide también a toda la Iglesia que recoja una ofrenda especial para la diócesis el domingo 12 de enero de 2014, el cuarto aniversario del terremoto.El consejo recibió un informe sobre el proyecto de reconstrucción de la catedral el 15 de octubre. Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Añadir una plaza sobre justicia y reconciliación racialesLa decisión de gastar $285.000 para pagar la labor de un funcionario que ayude a fomentar la justicia y la reconciliación raciales se produjo luego de lo que la  obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori definiera luego como “una discusión muy ardua, conflictual y tensa” que ella celebró que los miembros manejaron “con amabilidad”.El tono de la discusión no se debió a un desacuerdo sobre la necesidad de tal plaza, sino debido a los intereses encontrados sobre la manera en que el Consejo debía responder a un nuevo pronóstico de ingreso presupuestario trienal que predice un rédito adicional de $1.500.000. Ese rédito proviene fundamentalmente del ingreso añadido por concepto de alquileres de espacio en el centro denominacional y por ingresos diocesanos mayores de lo esperado y, en consecuencia, mayores compromisos [de las diócesis] con el presupuesto de la denominación.Algunos miembros del Consejo mostraron su preocupación en cuanto a si la Iglesia debía usar ese ingreso inesperado para financiar una nueva labor que habría de mantenerse durante trienios futuros o si debía usar ese dinero recién hallado para sufragar gastos de una sola vez o sólo gastos de capital. Otros cuestionaron si todo el dinero adicional esperado debía asignarse de inmediato. Y otros incluso preguntaron respecto al alcance de la responsabilidad del Consejo para consultar con el PB&F, el cual propone el presupuesto trienal a cada reunión de la Convención.Y otros se mostraron preocupados respecto al hecho que la proyección de ingresos vino a hacerse a fines de septiembre y creían que no tenían tiempo suficiente para considerar lo que Steve Hutchinson, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto de Gobierno y Administración para la Misión  (GAM) del Consejo, definió como la pregunta de cómo manejar más dinero de “un modo equitativo, abierto y equilibrado”.Mark Hollingsworth, obispo de la Diócesis de Ohio y presidente del FFM, dijo a sus colegas que los miembros del comité del FFM también veían la necesidad de la Iglesia de fomentar tal obra y tenían las mismas reservas respecto al proceso y a la filosofía presupuestaria.“Todos en Finanzas para la Misión estamos convencidos del mérito de esto, que esto es una labor que bien debemos hacer”, dijo [refiriéndose a la nueva plaza propuesta]. “Al mismo tiempo, creemos que poner esto en el presupuesto ahora mismo es establecer un nuevo cargo sin dialogar más, en particular con Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas, pero tampoco con otros respecto al modo en que manejamos un aumento de ingresos… Estamos divididos cada uno de nosotros personalmente, divididos acerca de esto”.“Ésta fue una conversación muy difícil”, aseveró él.Contemplaron sugerir que la decisión [de crear este nuevo cargo] se aplazara hasta la reunión del Consejo de febrero de 2014, pero “esto nos empujó más allá de donde podíamos ofrecer una orientación concreta al Consejo”, dijo Hollingsworth, quien le pidió al Consejo que debatiera el asunto.Diciendo que ella tenía el “mayor respeto por el proceso”, Anita George, miembro del Consejo y proveniente de Misisipí, expresó que “también ha habido procesos que han llevado a muchos de nosotros a preguntarnos ‘Dios mío, ¿cuánto tarda, cuánto tarda?’”.Interviniendo inmediatamente después de George, el Rdo. Brian Cole, de Lexington, dijo que él estaba “sintiendo la tensión en las vísceras mientras hablaba de esto”. Él se sentía “manipulado de cierta manera” por venir al Consejo y enterarse de que había más dinero disponible para gastar, [al tiempo que] le daban sugerencias específicas de cómo gastarlo y le pedían que decidiera inmediatamente.“Creo que nosotros, como un Consejo, realmente hacemos un trabajo mediocre en el proceso y en consecuencia yo no alentaría a que avanzáramos sobre este asunto en este momento”, dijo él, añadiendo que la Iglesia seguirá denunciando igualmente el racismo, lo mismo si el cargo se financie en octubre que en febrero. Reconoció encontrarse en “una situación realmente incómoda”, al pedir que se retrasara la decisión.Después el Rdo. Jon Floberg, de Dakota del Norte, habló de su preocupación respecto a gastar todo el nuevo ingreso enseguida y preguntó qué ocurriría si no hubiera suficiente dinero para seguir financiando la Iglesia Episcopal en Navajolandia. Wendel Gibbs, de la Diócesis de Michigan, dijo a sus colegas que él los suponía bien intencionados, pero, añadió que “[el asunto] no marcha cuando sin querer enfrentamos a un grupo étnico contra otro”.“¿Somos un pueblo de fe que cree que Dios proveerá, o no?, preguntó Gibbs.Dave Bailey, obispo de Navajolandia, reconoció que él se despierta de madrugada “preocupado de dónde van a llegar los dólares para la nómina”, pero dijo que la plaza propuesta es “sumamente necesaria”.“Yo no sé qué va a pasarnos, pero los alentaría a apoyar [la creación de] este cargo”, agregó.Lelanda Lee de Colorado, que preside el Comité Permanente Conjunto de Promoción Social e Interconexión, dijo que “como líderes flexibles tenemos una responsabilidad de ser audaces, para en verdad llegar adonde el evangelio nos conduce”.“Estamos perdiendo nuestra oportunidad de vivir el evangelio audazmente si no financiamos este puesto”, le dijo ella a los miembros del Consejo.El obispo Stacy Sauls, director de operaciones de la Iglesia, dijo, en respuesta a una pregunta de si el cargo no se había concebido después que se hizo obvio que habría más ingresos en el presupuesto.“La génesis del puesto no tuvo nada que ver con el hecho de que terminaría habiendo más ingresos”, y añadió que el pronóstico de más ingresos nos abrió un posible camino de convertir el cargo en una realidad.La idea de crear el cargo se produjo en respuesta a sucesos tales como la absolución de George Zimmerman por el asesinato de Trayvon Martin y el veredicto del Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. por el que invalidaba aspectos fundamentales de la Ley de Derechos Electorales, dijo Sauls. Esos sucesos en particular, añadió, motivaron al personal del centro denominacional a pensar que “tal vez era hora de retomar al liderazgo espiritual en la promoción de la justicia racial”.En total, el Consejo pasó alrededor de media hora debatiendo la creación de la plaza antes de que Jefferts Schori pidiera una oración y luego un receso. Cuando los miembros del Consejo regresaron, aprobaron rápidamente una versión revisada del presupuesto de 2014 que incluía el nuevo cargo.El presupuesto que aprobaron incluía la mayor parte de una serie de cambios propuestos por los funcionarios denominacionales, con dos grandes excepciones. En un caso, el FFM redujo en $100.000, luego de consultar con el personal [del centro denominacional], una adición propuesta de $350.000 de costos contractuales del “propietario” relacionados con los nuevos inquilinos del Centro [denominacional] de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York.En el otro cambio, el Consejo también convino en una sugerencia del FMM de que, en lugar de aprobar los $400.000 propuestos como apoyo económico de la Iglesia al presupuesto interanglicano para la Oficina de la Comunión Anglicana con sede en Londres, asignara $337.000 en el presupuesto de 2014. Esta última cifra es aproximadamente igual a la asignación para 2013. Hollingsworth le dijo al Consejo que el comité quería consultar con el PB&F respecto a la financiación de 2015. Y los miembros más tarde convinieron formalmente, mediante la Resolución WM016, en revisar el asunto en su reunión de febrero de 2014 “para considerar una financiación más sólida” en el presupuesto de 2015. Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis En otros asuntos, el Consejo* escuchó un breve informe de Brian Krislock, miembro del Consejo y vicepresidente del GAM, sobre la labor de un pequeño grupo de miembros del GAM y del FFM que están revisando un estudio sobre la posible reubicación del centro denominacional de la Iglesia, que el Consejo había pedido para febrero de 2012 y que recibió un año después.Él dijo que el comité está continuamente atento a “la ventaja actual y cómo usar esa ventaja, cómo lidiar con esa mudanza” entre tanto también conversa con los actuales inquilinos, con inquilinos potenciales y otros grupos que se han reubicado, al tiempo que prepara una encuesta para toda la Iglesia sobre lo que ésta quiere en un centro denominacional. Esa encuesta, planeada ya este año, indagaría sobre cosas tales como factores fiscales y geográficos, explicó Krislock.Todo este trabajo debe darle al grupo  una “mejor opinión” de lo que ha de ser el próximo paso y “lo que debemos buscar en la futura ubicación del centro denominacional”, añadió.Krislock advirtió a los miembros del Consejo que es “un tema muy sensible” hablar públicamente acerca de estudios que tengan que ver con la venta o retención potenciales de la propiedad del centro denominacional en el No. 815 de la Segunda Avenida en Nueva York.“Estamos investigando todas las posibilidades; no estamos descartando ninguna opción, pero no podemos revelar todas esas posibilidades porque nos están escudriñando las palabras, no los miembros de la Iglesia, sino los miembros de la comunidad de inversores y de bienes raíces de Nueva York”, afirmó.Después que la Convención General aprobó la Resolución D016 en julio de 2012, que dice “es la voluntad de esta Convención mudar el centro denominacional de la Iglesia” de ese edificio, contó Krislock, “los corredores de bienes raíces bombardearon la oficina del centro denominacional con llamadas en las que querían hacer ofertas sobre el edificio e investigar esa posibilidad”.Las declaraciones específicas del Consejo pueden influir en la evaluación del edificio y, por consiguiente, en sus posibles opciones para el mismo.Un resumen de todas las resoluciones aprobadas por el Consejo en la reunión puede encontrarse aquí.Algunos miembros del Consejo enviaron mensajes de Twitter desde la reunión valiéndose del código #ExCoun.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1) (a). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio].– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tras una discusión ‘muy ardua’, se crea un cargo en pro de la justicia racial El consejo Ejecutivo también reitera su apoyo a la reconstrucción en Haití Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Spokane diocese announces 4 nominees for bishop

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Posted Jun 16, 2016 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Elections Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Episcopal Diocese of Spokane] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Spokane has announced a slate of four nominees to stand for ninth bishop of the diocese.They are:The Rev. Canon Lucinda Ashby, canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Idaho;The Rev. Canon Neysa Ellgren Shepley, canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Oregon;The Ven. Christopher Athan Pappas, archdeacon for congregational development, Anglican Diocese of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; andThe Rev. Canon Gretchen M. Rehberg, rector, Episcopal Church of the Nativity, Lewiston, Idaho, in the Diocese of Spokane.Further information about the bishop search and the nominees is available here.The candidates, as well as any additional names received through the nomination by petition process, will be presented to the diocese the week of Sept. 26-30.The bishop-elect will succeed the Rt. Rev. James E. Waggoner, Jr., who is retiring after serving the diocese as its bishop since 2000.The election is scheduled to take place Oct. 14-16 during the 52nd Diocesan Convention in Lewiston, Idaho.The ordination and consecration is set for Saturday, March 18, 2017, in the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Spokane. Spokane diocese announces 4 nominees for bishop Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury calls for end to violence in South…

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Africa, Submit an Event Listing Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jul 12, 2016 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Archbishop of Canterbury calls for end to violence in South Sudan Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Sudan & South Sudan Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Lambeth Palace] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has called for the leaders in South Sudan to cease hostilities immediately and accept mediation.Welby also appealed to all those close to the leaders to seek to persuade them to accept such urgent mediation. Those who will suffer most are the poorest, especially women and children. Those who pursue violence will face the judgement of God in answer to the cries of the souls of those whose death they have caused.“They can still turn back: with our voices and our prayers to Jesus the Prince of Peace, let us call on them to do so,” WelbyThe Archbishop has visited South Sudan over the past two and a half years and seen for himself areas where the war had struck and the heartbreaking suffering of the people. The failure of the leaders is clear. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Rained out at anti-racism rally, Presiding Bishop vows ‘we will…

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 4, 2018 Advocacy Peace & Justice, April 6, 2018 at 10:35 am I believe that “white racism” must be the most misused term in the English language. That is, until it is replaced by something else that has become equally fashionable. . The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA April 4, 2018 at 7:42 pm The only way that bigotry [racism is misused] will be defeated is when humans no longer exist. That is to say that if there are humans there will be evil. Doug Desper says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Jane Jellison says: April 5, 2018 at 9:12 am Bruce, you think of people in terms if identity politics; that is, in groups. I don’t. While what happened 60 years ago was despicable there has been progress made. Lingering over the corpse of that era is not how to address the dynamics of today. We don’t live under segregation mandates anymore. By and large I see people of all races and walks mingle and get along with each other. Those who will not are not in monolithic groups but are outliers – sometimes noisy, disruptive, or violent – but outliers and hardly in a majority. Are there racists? Yep. Of all backgrounds. My reading of the recommended training materials and much conversational focus minimizes that and instead couches the discussion on white privilege. While that exists it does not exist to the preponderance that is being relied on. To believe that means that one has to ignore the ability and endurance shown time and again by people of other races. I’m not willing to assign them the status of being oppressed and helpless and make whole groups a “victim” when their durable spirits and efforts have shown that they surpassed as individuals. Bruce Garner says: Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Ed Lane says: Comments are closed. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Joe Prasad says: Rector Knoxville, TN Doug Desper says: Comments (10) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group April 4, 2018 at 8:16 pm Now if only the Episcopal leadership will actively call out the racists in the Black Lives Matter movement, and the Muslim Brotherhood, and Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam hate groups. That much of the “official speak” and anti-racism training singles out “whites only” is shortsighted, and dare we say a little racist itself? Hate and intolerance is fluently practiced by every race. Hard to see that fact in any recommended training that were all told will help to assuage the sin. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Katherine B Johnson says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 4, 2018 at 5:29 pm Let a little rain keep them from their job? Pitiful. The NCC said earlier that the rally “is part of a movement to change the horror of the assassination into a strong witness for ending racism.”The NCC, to which the Episcopal Church and nearly 40 other Christian traditions belong, vowed to “pick up the torch and carrying on with a multiyear effort to finish the work Dr. King began.” The effort is also endorsed by an ecumenical group of religious organizations.A.C.T. stands for awaken, confront and transform, and the NCC says its goal is to remove racism from the nation’s social fabric and bring the country together. The night before the rally, many participants met at Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Washington, D.C., to pray for an end to racism. The service took place on the Greek Orthodox Church’s Holy Tuesday, a day with a liturgy that is noted for its theme of repentance, according to the cathedral’s website.The rally and surrounding events will be followed April 5 by a National Day of Advocacy & Action. The day will include training in how to organize effective legislative visits and other aspects of such advocacy work, as well as actual visits to congressional offices.Curry’s planned participation in the rally was part of the Episcopal Church’s larger pledge “to act faithfully on its long history of honorable General Convention and Executive Council intentions but imperfect and fragmentary practical actions in matters of poverty, racism, sexism, and economic justice,” as the church’s Executive Council said in a resolution it passed at its January meeting. That resolution called for the church to develop an official relationship with the 2018 Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.Diocese of Milwaukee Bishop Steven Miller, right, and the Rev. Chuck Wynder, the Episcopal Church’s officer for social justice and advocacy engagement, listen to speakers April 4 at the A.C.T. to End Racism Rally on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Photo: Neva Rae FoxThe Episcopal Church is in the midst of a season of justice engagement, the Rev. Chuck Wynder, the church’s officer for social justice and advocacy engagement, told Episcopal News Service. That season has already included Episcopalians’ participation in the March 24 March for Our Lives.“One of our goals is to be in the public square on this 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. King,” Wynder said. “And, as a member church of the NCC, to participate actively in this long-term initiative to end racism by engaging in work and ministries of racial justice, racial equity and racial reconciliation both inside the church and in our communities.”He said that, by being involved in the A.C.T. rally, the Episcopal Church can “be in the public square and to state publicly on this very important day where we’re going and where we hope to go.”Wynder said the church’s involvement is also a way for Episcopalians to live into the Becoming Beloved Community effort that offers the Episcopal Church ways to organize its many efforts to respond to racial injustice and grow a community of reconcilers, justice-makers and healers. Getting involved in the 2018 Poor People’s Campaign is a significant step in that direction, he said.The 2018 campaign echoes King’s plan in 1968 for a Poor People’s Campaign, a plan he announced in a sermon on March 31, 1968, from the pulpit of Washington National Cathedral.Four days before he was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. preached his last Sunday sermon at Washington National Cathedral. “There comes a time when one must take the position that is neither safe nor politic nor popular, but he must do it because conscience tells him it is right,” King said. Photo: The Archives of the Episcopal Church“There is nothing new about poverty. What is new is that we now have the techniques and the resources to get rid of poverty. The real question is whether we have the will,” King said in what would be his last Sunday sermon before his death.“In a few weeks some of us are coming to Washington to see if the will is still alive or if it is alive in this nation. We are coming to Washington in a Poor People’s Campaign.”King assured the congregation that this would not be a “histrionic gesture” or one meant to cause violence. “We are coming to demand that the government address itself to the problem of poverty. We read one day, ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.’ But if a man doesn’t have a job or an income, he has neither life nor liberty nor the possibility for the pursuit of happiness. He merely exists,” he said.“We are coming to ask America to be true to the huge promissory note that it signed years ago. And we are coming to engage in dramatic nonviolent action, to call attention to the gulf between promise and fulfillment; to make the invisible visible.”Those demonstrations had been tentatively set for June 15, 1968. King was gunned down on April 4 by an assassin in Memphis, Tennessee, four days after his sermon at Washington National Cathedral. Thousands of people spilled out of the cathedral on April 5 to mourn his assassination.The cathedral will commemorate King’s sermon on April 4 with a choral evensong that will include scripture and music associated with the recognition of King. Following the service, the cathedral will play the sermon, titled “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution.” A non-downloadable audio recording is here.Washington National Cathedral also will participate in a worldwide tolling of church bells the evening of April 4. The toll will begin with the bells at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis at 6:01 p.m. CDT, followed by bells throughout that city, and then across the country and the world. The cathedral’s bells will sound at 7:05 p.m. EDT. Many Episcopal churches plan to join the tolling.The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, dean of the cathedral, recently noted that King was invited to preach in the cathedral to “explain ‘to the white clergy and the people of Greater Washington’ that his planned Poor People’s Campaign was intended to be ‘non-violent’ and not ‘disruptive of life in Washington.’” However, some Episcopalians protested the invitation. “It appears obvious that King’s purposes are definitely racist (one group only) and whose goal is to stir up more racial tension and anxiety, which can only lead to disaster,” one woman wrote.The cathedral will also commemorate King’s last sermon during its 11:15 a.m. Eucharist on April 8. The service will include recorded excerpts of King’s sermon along with music and prayers from the March 31, 1968 service.The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, the presiding bishop’s canon for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care, is interviewed in the media tent April 4 during the A.C.T. to End Racism Rally. Photo: Neva Rae FoxAnd, in Memphis on April 7, St. Mary’s Cathedral in the Diocese of West Tennessee will host a commemoration of the April 5, 1968 Ministers March, during which about 300 clergy gathered at the cathedral the day after King was killed about two miles away.The Very Rev. Andy Andrews, St. Mary’s dean, said in a recent letter that those clergy members, “after prayer and soul-searching discussion,” adopted a statement favoring the striking city sanitation workers whom King had come to the city to support. Approximately 150 ministers then marched from St. Mary’s to the mayor’s office to present their demands. Then-Dean Bill Dimmick led the march with the cathedral cross.“The cathedral congregation has never been the same,” Andrews said in his letter.St. Mary’s is hosting an all-day interfaith event April 7 that will include a block party and a worship service featuring some of the clergy who were at the original march. The march will also be re-enacted, and marchers are scheduled to meet with current Mayor Jim Strickland, whom Andrews said will “welcome us in a different fashion than Mayor [Henry] Loeb 50 years ago.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rained out at anti-racism rally, Presiding Bishop vows ‘we will act now for our future’ Numerous Episcopalians join A.C.T. to End Racism event commemorating King’s assassination Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 4, 2018 at 5:52 pm So sorry to have the PB bumped. It did get pretty rough out there, though. Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 5, 2018 at 7:56 am There may be bigotry and prejudice among minority groups but racism applies to the dominant racial group’s attitudes toward those of a different race. Trying to diminish the evil of racism by accusing racial minorities is just another way white folks (I’m white for what it’s worth) try to excuse their racism. I was 18 years old when Dr. King was murdered. I grew up with segregated buses, water fountains and the like. That is racism, Doug. Those vestiges still remain only they manifest themselves in more subtle ways. It takes work to see that our unearned privilege as white people supports our racist attitudes. It takes more work to try and turn our hearts toward the ultimate goal of a beloved community where everyone respects the dignity of every other person without qualification. April 5, 2018 at 9:02 am I hope the recorded statement will be posted soon. I would like to hear what the bishops had to say. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Larry Waters says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Louise Bower says: Rector Smithfield, NC April 9, 2018 at 10:01 am I am not sure if “white racism” or for that matter “anti-Semite” are misused terms. Perhaps, it is best to recognize these problems and work to bring more harmony in society. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Tony Oberdorfer says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton, both of whom were bumped from the A.C.T. to End Racism Rally lineup due to weather delays, prepare to record a video message from the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Photo: Neva Rae Fox[Episcopal News Service] Looking back on the horrific assassination 50 years ago of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and looking forward to the end of racism, Episcopalians came with thousands of others to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., April 4 for the A.C.T. to End Racism Rally.The day began cold and windy, and just before noon organizers delayed the rally for nearly 45 minutes out of concern for what one unidentified woman at the microphone called “a rapidly moving weather front” approaching the capital. She asked rally marshals to help attendees find cover in nearby museums, including the Smithsonian Institute.That weather delay caused the organizers to reshuffle the lineup of more than 60 speakers. Both Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton were bumped from the list. Curry was scheduled to lead off the rally’s last section, which formed a call to action and next steps.Instead, as the rally went on, he recorded a video message for the National Council of Churches, organizer of the event, to use.“We will act now, and we will act for our future, joining our brothers and sisters so that the future for our children will be a future worthy of them,” Curry said as he stood on the mall with the U.S. Capitol in the background.Curry said people gathered for the rally to “act now to engage in the work of seeking to eradicate racism and its vestiges in our country, and in our world.“We do so not simply to remember the past, but we do so to learn from the past in order that we might live and enter a transformed future.”Pointing over his shoulder to the Capitol, the presiding bishop said the building symbolizes “hope for our children – for generations of children yet to be born.” It is a hope, he said, “that there is equal opportunity for education no matter who they are, that there are voting rights for all citizens of this great country because all of us have been created in the image and likeness of God, as it says in the first chapter of Genesis, so that America will truly be America: a land of liberty, a land of justice, a land of equality.”Curry pledged the Episcopal Church’s commitment to making that hope a reality. “On this day and the days going forward, we as Episcopalians join with our fellow Christians and other people of goodwill and of all faiths and types who seek to make this world something that more closely resembles God’s dream and not a human nightmare,” he said.The rally’s speakers, each of whom were given a short amount of time at the microphone and many of whom ran over their time, included Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Islamic and Zoroastrian leaders. Secular activists spoke as well, including actors, singers, doctors and Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, the founders of Ben & Jerry’s.Cohen told the crowd that if he and Greenfield had been black, the ice cream company would not exist. “The deck would’ve been just too stacked against us,” he said. Featured Jobs & Calls April 4, 2018 at 11:59 pm Yes, Doug, there is bigotry in all groups, faiths, and communities. But, thanks to the leadership of PB Curry, we are working to become, if we are not already, the Jesus Movement in the Episcopal Church. With that goal in mind, we want to look at our own house, find our more subtle racism and not spend too much time creating lists of sinners in other faiths and groups. Hey, folks, it’s been less that a week since we lit the New Fire and someone sang, “the Light of Christ” and carried it down the aisle to shine ifs light on the Cantor as (s)he sang the Exaultat. We’ve got to carry that light and that song out of the building into the world!! Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop shares message of joy following royal wedding

first_img kilty mcgowen says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Frank McManus says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Royal Wedding 2018, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Michelle Samuels says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rose Anne Grasty says: May 19, 2018 at 8:04 pm Bishop Curry preach the Gospel of Love today like the true servant of Christ that he is called to be. He inspires me and gives me hope in a precarious time in our history. God bless Michael Curry! Featured Jobs & Calls Dr. Jan Hamilton says: May 19, 2018 at 5:07 pm Now we want you to conduct our lesbian wedding at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. We asked our church in Colorado to allow us to be married and they refused. That is our case of Religious Freedom for all at the US Supreme Court case 17-6685 and 17-7310 being submitted for reconsideration when denied. God loves all the same gay and straight! Your sermon today in London help re-confirm our faith in Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 19, 2018 at 4:29 pm All of us who have heard Bishop Curry speak before knew what to expect. That must be what was desired by those being married. May 19, 2018 at 5:41 pm The homily was wonderful. I especially liked the part about, if we follow the path of love, no child would ever have to go to bed hungry. Would that our world could reach that goal.And that the marriage rite is the same, for common people and royalty alike.And the hymns, loved them. Larry Waters says: Video Brent Brownhill Boller says: May 19, 2018 at 6:58 pm He hit it out of the park, as usual. Sister Barbara Jean Brown says: Sherian Van Matre says: Tags Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bartel Pieterse says: May 19, 2018 at 6:35 pm Wishing them joy and love in their new life together. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID May 20, 2018 at 3:51 pm Love this man! First time I’ve felt hope for our world in months. Joyce Rush says: May 20, 2018 at 1:42 pm Success!“We really did not expect to get inspired by a Royal Wedding, but there you are. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I am going to join the Episcopal Church.”https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/tv/a20756151/bishop-michael-curry-royal-wedding-sermon-recap/?src=socialflowTW Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME May 20, 2018 at 1:02 pm To: kilty mcgowenThank you for your comments. I totally disagree with you on all counts but love the fact that you feel free to share them. May 19, 2018 at 5:26 pm A wonderful uplifting homily, how fortunate we are as Christians and Episcopalians to have such a strong and inclusive message delivered by our Presiding Bishop, all are welcome! Come and help us to celebrate God’s LOVE! May 20, 2018 at 6:45 pm Bishop Curry makes me proud to be an Episcopalian! God bless him!! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Linda D Fuhrman says: Robert Zakowski says: AJRalston says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Rev. Deacon Kathleen Crowe says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA May 20, 2018 at 12:11 pm Not Episcopalian; am Christain 68yrs; your sermon was profound in it’s content, scope and Biblical message; and profoundly relevant for the people present in spite of their smirks,giggles of discomfort, and what appeared as irreverance; I have listened to the nessage several times now; And I can actively imagine the world as sanctuary, the redemptive power of love, of business and commerce based on the way of love; that the study of war is preempted by the way of love…the fire of love we celebrate at Pentecost!! Profound thanks for your message and the risk you took to preach it in that place and at that time.Blessings Rev Curry!! Rev.Dr.Karen ORourke,JD,MDiv,SJD says: Comments (29) Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET May 21, 2018 at 12:03 am I love many things English but your amazing sermon pointed to one thing I do not like. The Brits, especially the aristocracy, tend to be quite stuffy and your sermon leveled the field. I found myself rooting you on and enjoying the pained looks on many faces. You, in effect, told them to get off their entitled duffs and be about God,s work in this hurting world. Bless you! Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Rev Dr Lucretia Mann says: Comments navigation Newer comments Posted May 19, 2018 May 20, 2018 at 7:32 pm The world as a Sanctuary, filled with tolerance, support, and love for one another. Thank you, Bishop Curry, for such a vision, and may God continue to hold you up in your Christ-filled work. HG FULLER says: May 21, 2018 at 4:22 pm Bishop Curry, I truly enjoyed your message and found it inspirational. I am not a cradle Episcopalian (I came to the Episcopal Church as an adult), and I found your message marked by love and family by use of those old spirituals that were embedded within. Love and fire is what point people to the altar to wed, and you gave us some tools to continue to man the flames of that holy fire to do the Lord’s work. It is sad to me that some were distracted by the reference to slavery (the source of those songs) and the reference to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and seemed to have missed the message of love and service that comes from the passion fires of love…the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord! Thank you. It truly made me feel increasingly connected to what is now a familiar service. Submit an Event Listing May 21, 2018 at 3:52 pm When I heard that Bishop Curry would give the sermon at the royal wedding, I felt gladness that the inclusive message of the Episcopal Church would be heard by more people than ever before. I have never heard so much love, and hope and intelligence in 14 minutes. Brilliant. Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 JC Dade says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Jo-Anne Beckett says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 21, 2018 at 12:22 pm Bishop Curry, I am more proud than ever to be a member of the Episcopal Church! I knew you would preach the love of Jesus and you certainly did. Talk about Evangelism! Thank you for being always your authentic self and fully surrendered to let the love of God shine through you. Bravo! Rector Hopkinsville, KY John H. Jensen, M.S. says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 19, 2018 at 4:26 pm I just want to thank Bishop Curry for his message today, he not only made me proud to be an Episcopalian, but more importantly, proud to be a Christian. God Bless. Lin Tate says: May 19, 2018 at 4:10 pm A joyful day indeed. I especially like when PB said that they were married before God. Also, to enjoy festive, happy days in the midst of troublesome times. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Janet Van Sky says: May 20, 2018 at 9:05 am Greetings from South Africa. Our sincere thanks to reverent Curry for the significant way that you used the opportunity to spread the true gospel of Jesus Christ. I believe that many people over the world heard this wonderful life changing Message for the first time and many others heard the Message in its pure and untwisted form. Breaking with cold tradition and revolutionary like our Lord. May God bless you and your congregation and may you keep on fighting the good fight. Kind regards. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC May 19, 2018 at 8:07 pm Bishop Curry, thank you!!! Beautifully thought, written, and preached… you give us new hope. May 21, 2018 at 2:32 pm Based on the pro Bishop Curry comments, I should probably leave the EC. MLK and slavery have NOTHING to do with this wedding. Why did Bishop Curry have to politicize a wedding? Love is a grand and wonderful thing, but unfortunately love does NOT cure poverty or many other ills. I could see that Bishop Curry was enthusiastic about his topic; however, the wedding was NOT the venue to go on a lengthy discourse about love and fire. Sadly, the overall wedding was too lengthy. I guess it gave the “news media” something to fill the time slot. Usually, Anglican/Episcopal weddings are much shorter. Anyway, I pray that the new wife/husband have a loving and successful marriage. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathryn Lamb says: Comments navigation Newer comments May 20, 2018 at 2:54 am It was nothing more than a high priced circus. All they needed was the Holy-Roller PB of THE Episcopal church and they got it. How did this prince marry without his now wife had not gotten an annulment. Guess this church doesn’t require relief from an illicit marriage so they still are not married in the eyes of the church. This is what you get when you allow gays as priests along with females in places they don’t belong. Imagine a PB presiding over a lesbian wedding. An overt slap in the face of the True God. This used to be a beautiful church with morals and faith now it is an empty social shell.Thank you. This is just one of many posts that will not see the light of day. Speaking of freedom of speech. Yes we are cradle Episcopalians but left to return to the Roman Rite a true church. Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC May 21, 2018 at 5:12 pm A most amazing sermon, if you will, from a most amazing man. You made me so proud to have chosen the Episcopal Church as my church home. Look forward to the day i can meet you and hear you speak again. Video: Presiding Bishop shares message of joy following royal wedding Rector Albany, NY May 21, 2018 at 5:19 pm Larry Waters, I’m curious about your “politicizing” remark. I’m wondering if you’ve closely read the Gospels lately. I cannot think of a more political (pertaining to what is in the best interest of the community) teacher/rabbi/preacher than Jesus. Comments are closed. Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Jane Ramsey says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more