Lawsuit alleges sexual harassment, racial discrimination against University employee

first_imgTags: racial discrimination, Sexual harassment, University Lawsuit A student filed a lawsuit against the University on Friday seeking damages for alleged sexual harassment and racial discrimination by an employee of Notre Dame, according to court documents acquired and posted by WSBT.The suit alleges a white University employee — “Jane Roe”  — coerced the plaintiff — “John Doe,” an African-American student at the University — into a sexual relationship with her daughter, who attends a “nearby school” but is also an employee of the University.The suit also alleges University administrators knew  about the misconduct and, citing Title VI and Title IX, had a responsibility to intervene for the student’s wellbeing, which was compromised by a racially and sexually hostile environment.According to court documents, “Jane Roe” allegedly engaged in the following behaviors in the spring of 2015:“commanding, directing, encouraging, and convincing Plaintiff John Doe to engage in sexual relations with Defendant Jane Roe’s own daughter; arranging for sexual liaisons for Plaintiff John Doe; interrogating Plaintiff John about the nature, frequency, and quality of the sexual activities he had with Defendant Jane Roe’s daughter; harassing and demeaning Plaintiff John Doe with racially-charged comments;“pressuring Plaintiff John Doe to remain in the sexual relationship against his will; providing lodging, transportation, hotel rooms, and condoms for sexual excursions across state lines; and engaging in threatening behavior towards Plaintiff John Doe as he attempted to end the sexual relationship with her daughter.”The defendant, who served in “a role designed to provide academic support and counseling to students and student-athletes,” allegedly targeted other African-American males at the University including members of the football and basketball teams, according to court documents.When the student sought to end the relationship with the woman’s daughter, the defendant allegedly “utilized her position at the University to convince the Plaintiff John Doe of his need for mental counseling, arranging for Plaintiff John Doe to be seen by psychiatric support employed by the [University],” according to court documents.The defendant also allegedly sought to pressure the student into converting to Catholicism, according to the suit.The suit goes on to say that the plaintiff was then seen by an employee who was “a friend and confidant” of the defendant, and who “sought to medicate Plaintiff John Doe to keep him passive, cooperative, and under control to forestall any exposure of this exploitative and perverse conduct and hostile environment.”University vice president for public affairs and communications Paul Browne said the University is aware of the suit, but denies all allegations of misconduct.“The allegations against the University of Notre Dame in the complaintare unfounded, as are gratuitous and unfounded references to ‘studentathletes’ — an allegation that is nothing more than a cynical attemptto attract publicity,” Browne said in a statement.last_img read more

Men’s hockey to be recommended as official Big Ten sport

first_imgPark Ridge, Ill. – The directors of athletics of Big Ten institutions which sponsor men’s ice hockey unanimously announce their intention to recommend to the Big Ten Council of Presidents/Chancellors in June the establishment of men’s ice hockey as an official conference sport for the 2013-14 academic year with participation by Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Ohio State, Penn State and Wisconsin.The recommendation includes both the establishment of the inaugural Big Ten Men’s Ice Hockey Tournament in March of 2014, with the winner earning the conference’s automatic bid to the NCAA Men’s Ice Hockey Championship, and a 20-game conference schedule with each team playing the other five schools four times (two home games and two away games). In addition, the Big Ten’s men’s ice hockey programs will continue to proactively work to maintain a strong schedule of non-conference competition with the Central Collegiate Hockey Association (CCHA) and Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA).In September of 2010, Penn State announced the establishment of men’s and women’s ice hockey programs set to begin competition in the 2012-13 academic year, giving the Big Ten six institutions sponsoring men’s ice hockey. Big Ten rules allow for a conference championship when six institutions sponsor a program in any given sport.Since Penn State’s announcement, the conference has researched and investigated the establishment of men’s ice hockey as a conference sport. The conference has sought input and communicated both internally with conference chancellors, presidents, administrators and coaches, and externally with members of the hockey community, including the CCHA and WCHA.With the addition of Nebraska on July 1, 2011, the broad-based athletic programs of the 12 Big Ten institutions will sponsor 298 teams with more than 9,500 men and women student-athletes competing for Big Ten Championships. The conference currently features 25 official conference sports, 12 for men and 13 for women. The last official conference sport established by the Big Ten was women’s rowing in the 1999-2000 academic year.last_img read more