Lawsuit alleges sexual harassment, racial discrimination against University employee

first_imgTags: racial discrimination, Sexual harassment, University Lawsuit A student filed a lawsuit against the University on Friday seeking damages for alleged sexual harassment and racial discrimination by an employee of Notre Dame, according to court documents acquired and posted by WSBT.The suit alleges a white University employee — “Jane Roe”  — coerced the plaintiff — “John Doe,” an African-American student at the University — into a sexual relationship with her daughter, who attends a “nearby school” but is also an employee of the University.The suit also alleges University administrators knew  about the misconduct and, citing Title VI and Title IX, had a responsibility to intervene for the student’s wellbeing, which was compromised by a racially and sexually hostile environment.According to court documents, “Jane Roe” allegedly engaged in the following behaviors in the spring of 2015:“commanding, directing, encouraging, and convincing Plaintiff John Doe to engage in sexual relations with Defendant Jane Roe’s own daughter; arranging for sexual liaisons for Plaintiff John Doe; interrogating Plaintiff John about the nature, frequency, and quality of the sexual activities he had with Defendant Jane Roe’s daughter; harassing and demeaning Plaintiff John Doe with racially-charged comments;“pressuring Plaintiff John Doe to remain in the sexual relationship against his will; providing lodging, transportation, hotel rooms, and condoms for sexual excursions across state lines; and engaging in threatening behavior towards Plaintiff John Doe as he attempted to end the sexual relationship with her daughter.”The defendant, who served in “a role designed to provide academic support and counseling to students and student-athletes,” allegedly targeted other African-American males at the University including members of the football and basketball teams, according to court documents.When the student sought to end the relationship with the woman’s daughter, the defendant allegedly “utilized her position at the University to convince the Plaintiff John Doe of his need for mental counseling, arranging for Plaintiff John Doe to be seen by psychiatric support employed by the [University],” according to court documents.The defendant also allegedly sought to pressure the student into converting to Catholicism, according to the suit.The suit goes on to say that the plaintiff was then seen by an employee who was “a friend and confidant” of the defendant, and who “sought to medicate Plaintiff John Doe to keep him passive, cooperative, and under control to forestall any exposure of this exploitative and perverse conduct and hostile environment.”University vice president for public affairs and communications Paul Browne said the University is aware of the suit, but denies all allegations of misconduct.“The allegations against the University of Notre Dame in the complaintare unfounded, as are gratuitous and unfounded references to ‘studentathletes’ — an allegation that is nothing more than a cynical attemptto attract publicity,” Browne said in a statement.last_img read more

Complaints about spoofing could make it harder for CUs to reach members

first_imgFlorida’s Attorney General said skimming and spoofing scams are on the rise in the state, and that could make it trickier for credit unions and other financial institutions to get in touch with members about legitimate issues.In a June 27 consumer alert, the agency said the Florida Department of Law Enforcement was getting a growing number of reports about criminals using skimmers to steal credit card and debit card data. The criminals then use spoofing technology to call victims and pose as employees of their financial institutions. During the calls, criminals tell the victims that their accounts have been compromised and that the financial institution needs the CV2 security code from the back of their cards in order to “freeze” their accounts. The scammers subsequently use the information to make fraudulent purchases, withdraw money from the member’s account or sell the member’s account information, according to the Attorney General’s office.“This scam incorporates some of the worst uses of modern technology to drain victims’ bank accounts and ruin their credit,” Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody said. “Floridians must arm themselves with the latest information and take steps to avoid these fraudsters to protect their hard-earned money.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more