Watch Courtney Barnett Rock Grateful Dead Cover At Mountain Jam

first_imgSinger/songwriter Courtney Barnett has seen nothing but success in 2016, riding high from her 2015 release, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. While Barnett’s stock continues to skyrocket in the indie scene, jam fans everywhere took notice of her impressive cover of the Grateful Dead’s “New Speedway Boogie” from the comprehensive Day of the Dead tribute album.See Where Barnett Ranked On Our Top 15 Recap Of ‘Day Of The Dead’Naturally, her debut at Mountain Jam was the perfect opportunity to perform the shuffling track. Check out footage of Courtney Barnett rocking some Grateful Dead at the festival earlier this weekend, courtesy of GratefuLSD.last_img read more

Jack White To Perform On Saturday Night Live With His New Band Next Month

first_imgAs part of the current promotional push behind his newly-released album, Jack White will bring his new-look live band to 30 Rockefeller Plaza to serve as the musical guest for the April 14th episode of long-running NBC sketch comedy program Saturday Night Live. The host of that evening’s show will be comedian John Mulaney, who got his start as part of the SNL writing staff for six seasons.Jack White’s new album, Boarding House Reach, was released earlier this month, marking his third solo album and his first formal music project since 2014’s Lazaretto. After remaining musically silent for a number of years, the thirteen-track album sees White expanding his musical palate with perhaps his most ambitious work thus far, a collection of songs that are simultaneously timeless and modern.According to the press release, Boarding House Reach was “written and conceived while holed up in a spartan apartment with no outside distractions” in which, “White replicated the identical environment and used the same gear as when he was a 15-year-old (a quarter-inch four-track tape recorder, a simple mixer, and the most basic of instrumentation) to pen sketches of the album’s songs.”White is supporting his new release with a new touring band featuring Neal Evans (Lettuce/Soulive) and Quincy McCrary (Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Pitbull) on keys, Carla Azar (Autolux, Depeche Mode, Doyle Bramhall II) on drums, and Dominic Davis on bass guitar. You can get a sneak peek of this new outfit’s live show from their album release party in Brooklyn on March 23rd below:Jack White – Full Show Video [Pro-Shot] – 3/23/18[Video: Dave Allen]Saturday Night Live also announced that Grammy-nominated Bronx, NY rapper Cardi B will serve as the musical guest for the episode prior, alongside host Chadwick Boseman, star of the box office record-shattering film, Black PantherYesterday, the show also released a video detailing what goes into staging Saturday Night Live musical guest performances. You can check that out below:Creating Saturday Night Live: Live Music – SNL[Video: Saturday Night Live]last_img read more

Reinhold Brinkmann

first_imgReinhold Brinkmann, a distinguished scholar whose writings on music of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries made an indelible mark on musicology in Germany and the United States, taught in the Department of Music at Harvard University from 1985 until his retirement in 2003, serving, after 1990, as James Edward Ditson Professor of Music and, from 1991-1994, as department Chair.His commitment to teaching and high standards for performance from students was clear in the way he ran his Core course, “The Symphonic Century.”  He told students that he assumed they could read music and had considerable experience with the repertory already.  But just in case there were students who felt that a little brushing up might help, he came an hour early to every class to give a sort of shadow course to anyone wise enough to realize what a gift they were being given.  In his Core course on fin-de-siècle Vienna, Reinhold, who did not like the word “interdisciplinary,” spoke with passion and immense erudition about the paintings of Kokoschka and Klimt, the plays of Hofmannsthal, the novels of Joseph Roth, and the architecture of Adolf Loos.  Most amazing of all, he inspired legions of undergraduates to delve into, appreciate, and, in some cases, even to love the atonal music of Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern.Reinhold was in his time at Harvard not only a remarkably warm and caring colleague, but a very effective Chair, in part thanks to his strong relationships with colleagues in composition, theory, and music history.  He was that rare figure of a music historian who was passionately curious about the newest music.  He worked closely with all his Harvard composer colleagues, and also enjoyed close friendships with composers Helmut Lachenmann, Wolfgang Rihm, and Luciano Berio, who dedicated his Sonata per pianoforte solo to him in 2001.Reinhold came to Harvard from West Berlin, where he had been a Professor at the Hochschule der Künste since 1980, and, prior to that, Professor of Musicology at the University of Marburg.  From 1976-1980, he directed the Institut für Neue Musik und Musikerziehung in Darmstadt.  He received his doctorate from the Universität Freiburg (with H. H. Eggebrecht) in 1967, and his Habilitation from the Freie Universität, Berlin (with Rudolf Stephan) in 1970.Born in 1934, in Wildeshausen, Germany, at a time when his country was ruled by an infamous regime that did not, fortunately, last one thousand years, but only twelve, Reinhold often spoke of one of his earliest memories: when he was four years old, experiencing the tumult and the smell of burning buildings on Kristallnacht, he could not understand why the firemen did not come.  These childhood traumas not only shaped Reinhold’s later left-wing political consciousness, but also underlay his acute awareness of the links between music, culture, and society.  At his death, he was working on a book called “The Distorted Sublime” about how the Nazi regime appropriated and misused the German classical musical tradition.His writings span a broad range of topics, including the Second Viennese School (especially Schoenberg), the Romantic Lied tradition, Wagner, Skryabin, Varèse, Eisler, and Ives.  Brinkmann’s work combines intimate knowledge of the music, often shown in detailed, painstaking analyses, with an awareness of its social and political backgrounds and ramifications.  His publications include his nuanced and thought-provoking study of Brahms’s Second Symphony, Late Idyll (Harvard University Press, 1995) and a volume on German musicians who fled Fascism, co-edited with Christoph Wolff, “Driven Into Paradise”: The Musical Migration from Nazi Germany to the United States (1999).  His edition of Schoenberg’s Pierrot lunaire for the Schoenberg Gesamtausgabe, in particular his book-length critical report on the work’s sources and its historical and biographical position, was a groundbreaking contribution to the Schoenberg literature.  His choice of Arnold Schoenberg’s atonal music as a dissertation topic was highly unusual in Germany in the 1960s.  In his path-breaking study of Schoenberg’s Three Pieces for Piano, Op. 11, Brinkmann developed his own analytical method, rigorous yet contextual, which yielded major insights into Schoenberg’s aesthetic and historical position.  A lifelong interest in German Lieder and poetry was reflected in his monograph, Schumann und Eichendorff: Studien zum Liederkreis Op. 39 (1997) and in his substantial contribution on the nineteenth century Lied tradition in the volume Musikalische Lyrik (2004).  Reinhold was always fascinated with the frieze of famous composers’ names in Paine Hall, and his last publication, Harvard’s Paine Hall: Musical Canon and the New England Barn (2010), was a playful and learned essay on the origins of the building and its visible display of the musical canon, anno 1914.In 2001, Reinhold was the first musicologist to be awarded the prestigious Ernst von Siemens Music Prize.  His acceptance speech was a visionary declaration of what musicology could be.  This “new musicology” imagined, first, the fundamental equality of all musical traditions as objects of study.  He also envisioned new ways of communicating about music that could include the general public: “I see musicologists learning from poets, speaking and writing in an understandable but richly nuanced language.”  His own work, with its lucid prose, forceful thinking, and deep humanity, exemplifies this vision.  In 2006 he was elected an Honorary Member of the American Musicological Society, a major honor and a singular one for a scholar neither born nor trained in the United States. Conversations always branched out from music to art, literature, architecture, sports, and history, and he always had time to talk.  Reinhold had an absolutely penetrating gaze when he was looking for a certain answer—it sometimes terrified graduate students until they saw where he was going, said the right thing, and were rewarded with his thundering “yes!”  His colleagues sometimes felt the same terror and joy.He possessed a sartorial elegance that we may not see in our department again.  Most inspiring to his students was his conviction that musicology was not simply an academic discipline, but rather a deeply ethical undertaking that could have a real impact on the way we hear music and see the world.  Musicology has lost a scholar of great insight and integrity, and we will miss him.Reinhold Brinkmann died, after a long illness, in Eckernförde, Germany, at the age of 76. He is survived by his wife, Dorothea, and his brother, Richard. Respectfully submitted,Thomas Forrest KellyLewis LockwoodChristoph WolffAnne C. Shreffler, Chairlast_img read more

Prof. studies brain trauma

first_imgResearch professor Mayland Chang is taking to heart the maxim “a mind is a terrible thing to waste” in two ways, as she uses her mind to the fullest by working to develop a treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Chang, director of the Chemistry-Biochemistry-Biology Interface (CBBI) Program, said she and other researchers have been studying a group of 27 enzymes called Matrix metalloproteinases (MPPs) for more than a decade. She said the team has found a promising use for one of these enzymes, Matrix metallopeptidase nine (MPP-9), in treating TBI. “We thought that this group of enzymes would be important for many diseases. Not much was known, so we started making inhibitors,” Chang said. “It turns out MPP-9 plays a critical role in the pathology of TBI.” Chang said every case of TBI essentially can be divided into two injuries, each with different effects. “You have the primary injury, the blow to the head,” Chang said. “There is absolutely nothing you can do for the brain cells that die in the primary injury. This is followed by a cascade of events, starting with damage to the blood-brain barrier, that result in the secondary injury. The secondary injury is linked to long term problems, including coma and death.” MPP-9 contributes to the secondary injury by cleaving tau proteins, so inhibiting MPP-9 can prevent the cascade of events leading to the secondary injury, Chang said. Chang said she has personal reasons for seeking an effective TBI treatment. Her mother passed away as a result of a severe TBI in 1997 at the age of 70, having slipped and hit her head on her patio. Chang said she is also motivated by the threat of TBI her son faced as a competitive snowboarder. Chang said no therapeutics for TBI currently exist because of the nature of the condition and reluctance on the part of pharmaceutical companies. “There are no existing therapeutics for TBI because of the difficulty of getting compounds through the brain-blood barrier and because TBI is an acute condition and ‘big pharma’ is more interested in chronic conditions. … Big pharma is not really working on diseases like this,” she said. Chang said her research group has been fortunate that the compounds they use effectively cross the blood-brain barrier, something more than 98 percent of drugs are incapable of doing. “It’s very challenging for drugs to cross the barrier and reach therapeutic concentration,” she said. “We are lucky with the compounds we have, which are able to cross the barrier on their own.” Chang said one of the biggest challenges has been maintaining this quality while also making the compounds more water-soluble. Water solubility enables the compounds to be injected, which is important, given that many patients with TBI are unconscious or otherwise unable to swallow.  The most recent version of the treatment compound is working in animal models, specifically, mice, in terms of both water solubility and penetrating the blood-brain barrier, Chang said. Contact Christian Myers at [email protected],Research professor Mayland Chang is taking to heart the maxim “a mind is a terrible thing to waste” in two ways, as she uses her mind to the fullest by working to develop a treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Chang, director of the Chemistry-Biochemistry-Biology Interface (CBBI) Program, said she and other researchers have been studying a group of 27 enzymes called Matrix metalloproteinases (MPPs) for more than a decade. She said the team has found a promising use for one of these enzymes, Matrix metallopeptidase nine (MPP-9), in treating TBI. “We thought that this group of enzymes would be important for many diseases. Not much was known, so we started making inhibitors,” Chang said. “It turns out MPP-9 plays a critical role in the pathology of TBI.” Chang said every case of TBI essentially can be divided into two injuries, each with different effects. “You have the primary injury, the blow to the head,” Chang said. “There is absolutely nothing you can do for the brain cells that die in the primary injury. This is followed by a cascade of events, starting with damage to the blood-brain barrier, that result in the secondary injury. The secondary injury is linked to long term problems, including coma and death.”  MPP-9 contributes to the secondary injury by cleaving tau proteins, so inhibiting MPP-9 can prevent the cascade of events leading to the secondary injury, Chang said. Chang said she has personal reasons for seeking an effective TBI treatment. Her mother passed away as a result of a severe TBI in 1997 at the age of 70, having slipped and hit her head on her patio. Chang said she is also motivated by the threat of TBI her son faced as a competitive snowboarder. Chang said no therapeutics for TBI currently exist because of the nature of the condition and reluctance on the part of pharmaceutical companies. “There are no existing therapeutics for TBI because of the difficulty of getting compounds through the brain-blood barrier and because TBI is an acute condition and ‘big pharma’ is more interested in chronic conditions. … Big pharma is not really working on diseases like this,” she said. Chang said her research group has been fortunate that the compounds they use effectively cross the blood-brain barrier, something more than 98 percent of drugs are incapable of doing. “It’s very challenging for drugs to cross the barrier and reach therapeutic concentration,” she said. “We are lucky with the compounds we have, which are able to cross the barrier on their own.” Chang said one of the biggest challenges has been maintaining this quality while also making the compounds more water-soluble. Water solubility enables the compounds to be injected, which is important, given that many patients with TBI are unconscious or otherwise unable to swallow.  The most recent version of the treatment compound is working in animal models, specifically, mice, in terms of both water solubility and penetrating the blood-brain barrier, Chang said. Contact Christian Myers at [email protected]last_img read more

Man Charged In Sex Crimes Case

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.MAYVILLE – A Cherry Creek man has been charged in connection with sex crimes that allegedly occurred over the Fourth of July holiday weekend in the Village of Mayville.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office charged Scott Dellahoy, 35, with two counts of forcible touching, third-degree sexual misconduct and false imprisonment.Deputies say Dellahoy turned himself in on Wednesday.He was arraigned at the Chautauqua County Jail and released on his own recognizance. No additional information was released about the case.last_img read more

Pandemic could affect vegetable harvest

first_imgMost vegetable crops in Georgia — such as bell pepper, specialty peppers, tomato, eggplant, cucumber, yellow squash, and zucchini — are currently being planted into early April. These crops should be harvested in May and June; however, in light of the current coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, Georgia growers, who rely on seasonal workers, need to plan ahead to be prepared for the harvest.The indefinite closure of U.S. consulates and borders may cause a delay in the processing of agricultural workers’ visas (H2A) or prevent them from entering the U.S.According to the Bureau of Consular Affairs, the number of agricultural workers entering the country on H2A visas has increased dramatically since 2000. In 2019, 204,801 of all U.S. agricultural workers were workers on H2A visas, and a significant portion of those workers help to keep the Georgia vegetable industry viable. In 2018, Georgia’s vegetable industry generated $1.13 billion in farm gate value and 13,900 jobs (Wolfe and Stubbs, 2018).As of March 26, there is an authorization to grant interview waivers for H-2 applicants whose visa expired within the last 48 hours, who have not previously received an H-2 visa or whose visa expired more than 48 months ago. This will speed the process for growers to get labor, however planning ahead is still vital for timely harvest of spring crops.Estimating the number of workers required to harvest the planted acreage is the first step to ensure vegetables and fruits are out of the field in a timely manner. Furthermore, it is important to highlight that harvested products must be packed before reaching the consumer. Labor in the packing line is also a key point in this process. Overall, farms have different activities and crop management practices and, consequently, labor requirements vary widely. Producers should identify activities and periods of intense labor demand in their operations and try to stagger these periods, rather than coinciding labor peak needs.Ultimately, the legitimate trade between the U.S. and other countries is still open, and the U.S. continues to import produce from countries such as Mexico. Growers, now more than ever, should secure the market for their crops. It seems alarming that grocery stores have empty shelves, however, this is a result of delays in restocking rather than a malfunction in the food supply chain. Identifying your partners is crucial for business success.The uncertainty of the current COVID-19 situation is ongoing. While the coming days will reveal the way, being prepared will ensure the success of the Georgia vegetable industry.To see more resources from the UGA vegetable team, visit vegetables.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

Women leaders welcome CJ’s decision to dissolve Parliament

first_imgWomen leaders have welcomed Chief Justice David Maraga’s decision advising the President to dissolve Parliament for failing to pass the 2/3rd gender rule.Speaking in Kajiado after attending a rites of passage ceremony at Ematoroki Olngesher, the women MPs led by Homabay Woman Rep Gladys Wanga lauded Maraga for his courage saying Parliament must accept it has failed as far as the two third gender rule is concerned.Nominated Senator Rose Nyamunga called upon the Chief Justice to uphold the constitution and support the implementation of the law without fear.Also Read  Ivory products worth Ksh 10 million seized in KajiadoFormer Nairobi County Assembly Speaker Beatrice Elachi said Maraga must ensure he leaves a legacy when his term comes to an end and the only way to be remembered is by ensuring that institutions are taken to task for failing in the mandate.Also Read  SRC moves to address pay disparities   Kajiado East MP Peris Tobiko however urged women to seek more elective positions in the forthcoming general election even as she lauded Maraga for his stand on the gender bill.Also Read  2/3rd gender headache: Maraga calls for dissolution of Parliament Likoni Mp Mishi Mboko said the decision to dissolve Parliament shouldn’t have come at a better time citing frustrations from their male counterparts in their attempts to adopt a legislation to enact the 2/3rd gender rule.Get breaking news on your Mobile as-it-happens. SMS ‘NEWS’ to 20153last_img read more

Former CONCACAF president Jack Warner loses extradition appeal

first_imgPORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC) – Former international football strongman, Jack Warner, yesterday suffered a major setback in his fight against extradition to face corruption charges in the United States, after the Court of Appeal here dismissed a judicial review challenging that extradition.The 76-year-old Trinidadian had his initial claim for judicial review dismissed by High Court judge James Aboud in 2017, but had subsequently challenged the ruling, contesting the process by which the extradition proceedings against him were being carried out and seeking to quash the authority to proceed (ATP) which was signed in 2016 by Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi.A former powerful former FIFA vice-president and CONCACAF president, Warner also challenged the legality of the Extradition (Commonwealth and Foreign Territories) Act, and the treaty signed between this country and the US.In a 40-page written decision dismissing the latest claim, however, the Court of Appeal comprising Justices Gregory Smith, Prakash Moosai and Andre des Vignes said the extradition treaty had not been shown to lack conformity with the Act and there was no merit in Warner’s case that the U.S. order which declared that country as a declared foreign territory was not valid.“Therefore, the pending extradition proceedings in respect of the appellant before the magistrate are valid,” the Court of Appeal ruled, adding that “there was no denial of justice in the issuance of the ATP by the Attorney General”.The Court of Appeal stayed the magisterial proceedings for 21 days pending an application by Warner for permission to argue his case at the London-based Privy Council, the country’s highest and final court.Cayman Islands’ Jeffrey Webb is currently awaiting sentencing in the US.Warner, who is on TT$2.5M (US$369 365) bail, was one of nine former and current executives of football’s world governing body, FIFA, to be named in a 47-count indictment by then U.S. Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, back in 2015.The indictment alleged racketeering, wire fraud and money-laundering conspiracies among other offences spanning 24 years in a scheme “to enrich themselves through the corruption of international soccer”.Cayman Islands’ Jeffrey Webb, who replaced Warner as CONCACAF president and FIFA vice-president following the cash-for-votes scandal of 2011, was also indicted. He subsequently pleaded guilty and is currently awaiting sentencing in the U.S.Warner, a long-serving Caribbean Football Union president and a former government minister here, is charged with 12 offences related to racketeering, corruption and money-laundering allegedly committed in the jurisdiction of the United States and Trinidad and Tobago, dating as far back as 1990.But Warner has claimed the case against him is politically motivated, accusing the United States of seeking revenge because it lost to Qatar in its bid to host the 2022 World Cup.He surrendered himself to police here in 2015, after learning of the provisional warrant for his arrest.last_img read more

Wisconsin upsets MSU 4-0

first_imgCHAMPAIGN, Ill. — On paper, Wisconsin didn’t have a chance. UW was the 11th seed in a tournament with only 10 other participants.The squad’s first-round opponent — sixth-seeded Michigan State — had silenced the Badgers 5-2 just weeks earlier in East Lansing, Mich. And winning has, for the most part, been an exception to the rule for Wisconsin this season.But Thursday, the UW women’s tennis team confounded expectations, silencing the Spartans 4-0 in the opening round of the Big Ten Tournament. It was a match marked by polarizing comebacks, lopsided set scores and a form of dominant behavior heretofore unseen from the Wisconsin team.”It feels great,” sophomore Morgan Tuttle said. “Just to … get one postseason win is great — it’s a great feeling.”The Badgers started the day by claiming the doubles point, holding even on the second and third courts three games each before pulling away. The mid-flight UW tandem of Tuttle and Chelsea Nusslock defeated Stephanie Kebler and Jessica Baron 8-4, while Badgers Kaylan Caiati and Erin Jobe downed Marianne Eelens and Ana Milosavljevic 8-3 on the third court.Meanwhile, team ace Caitlin Burke and freshman Elizabeth Carpenter rallied from a three-game deficit to bring their affair on the top court to 5-6 before play was called on account of the point having been clinched.When matters turned to the singles court, the drama only heightened as several Badgers held close with their Spartan opponents well into the first set before a notable degree of parity was achieved. On the top court, Burke found herself at a 3-5 disadvantage and facing set point before rallying to pry the first frame away from Bader 7-5.After that, there was no looking back for the UW junior, who claimed her second set 6-0 and clinched the Wisconsin victory on the day.”She’s got a really big serve. I was struggling in the first five, ten games just to get her serve back in play,” Burke said. “She was winning her serves so easily. And then I started getting a better rhythm and broke her a few times, and I think that got into her head a little bit.”Once I won the first three games of the second [set], it was basically over.”The day’s first individual Wisconsin victory belonged to Tuttle, however, who made quick work of Milosavljevic on the fifth court with a 6-1, 6-2 win that drew to a close well before most of the other meets had concluded their first set.”I think I just went out there positive and confident,” Tuttle said. “I just wanted another win under my belt.”Carpenter garnered the day’s second individual victory with a 6-3, 6-2 win over MSU’s Sarah Andrews and that effort — combined with the doubles point, Tuttle’s win already on the books and Burke’s victory soon thereafter — was enough to clinch a first-round victory for the underdog Badgers and punch Wisconsin a ticket to the second round of the Big Ten Tournament.Still, UW found itself playing without sophomore Nicole Beck as she was sidelined with an injury Thursday. However, matters equaled out as Spartan standout Pascale Schnitzer — who almost certainly would have been slated to play against Beck — was also relegated to the bench with an unspecified injury that had her on crutches for much of the contest.”As I said to Michigan State, we’ve been in the position all year long of playing shorthanded,” Henderson said, in partial reference to an injury that claimed Burke for eight weeks of the spring season. “That might have been the first time that [Michigan State] psychologically had to go into a match without one of their players. That might have had something to do with it once we got in control.”Thursday’s victory secures the Badgers a spot in Friday play, where they will take on the third-seeded Michigan Wolverines in a 2 p.m. quarterfinal contest. Last time the two teams met, Michigan emerged victorious in a lopsided 7-0 effort.But it should be noted that the Wolverine win came only 24 hours before that 5-2 loss at the hands of the Spartans — a loss the Badgers finally vindicated Thursday.last_img read more

Gilligan returns, helps steer Syracuse to 2-2 tie against UConn

first_img Published on October 19, 2014 at 10:28 pm Contact Liam: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse Goalkeeper Jenn Gilligan slapped her stick on the ice after making her 12th save of the night.Leah Bures had just unleashed a wrist shot from 15 feet away that Gilligan collected in her glove.“I thought she did a real good job,” said head coach Paul Flanagan when asked about his goalie’s play. “She handled the puck well. We’re excited about the experience she brings and she’s been pretty consistent so far.”Flanagan was happy with his goalkeeper’s 17 save effort as Syracuse (1-1-4) played UConn (2-3-2) to a 2-2 overtime tie on Sunday afternoon at Tennity Ice Pavilion. Gilligan allowed two goals in the second period – one on a power play – but was otherwise solid between the pipes.Making her return after sitting out Saturday’s 3-3 tie against Providence — she missed three days of practice earlier in the week with an injury — Gilligan stopped a Huskies offense that peppered the net early with 18 of its 19 shots coming in the first two periods.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn a four-on-four situation nine minutes into the second period, UConn’s Sarah MacDonnell played the puck to Theresa Knutson. She failed to score on a backhand shot but buried her own rebound in front of the goal.Flanagan said he thought the Huskies just caught Gilligan sleeping.UConn went ahead 2-1 when, from the top of the right side of the blue line, Rebecca Fleming threaded a pass to Emily Snodgrass.She pushed the puck underneath Gilligan’s right pad and into the left corner of the net. The goal came after sophomore left wing Morgan Blank was called for a two minute holding penalty, giving UConn a power play and the scoring chance.“Power play goals are always so difficult,” said Gilligan. “Obviously, it’s an extra attacker so there’s a lot of puck movement, a lot of bodies in front, so I’m just doing my best to cover the low ice and it somehow managed to get past me.”The one shot that Gilligan faced late came on a third-period slap shot from Lum about a foot in from the blue line. Lum gathered the puck and fired a shot that went high on Gilligan’s glove side. The junior goalkeeper snagged the puck with her glove.Flanagan called the save “huge” as it kept he game within reach for the Orange, allowing SU to tie the game on a last-second goal from Jessica Sibley as regulation expired.Gilligan credited UConn’s lack of opportunities to her defense and the rest of the players in front of her.“We came out in the third and showed some character,” said Sibley. “That’s a good thing.” Commentslast_img read more